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Pacific Biosciences ... Pain Therapeutics ... Palmer Labs ... Paloma Pharmaceuticals ... Panacos Pharmaceuticals .... Panomics ... Paper Battery ... Paradigm Sensors ... Paragon Dynamics ... Paragonix Technologies ... Parasol Therapeutics ... Paratek Pharmaceuticals ... Parion Sciences ... Passport Systems .. Pasteuria Bioscience ... PathoGenetix ... PatientWise ... Patton Medical Devices ... Patton Surgical ... PercipEnz Technologies ... PersonalBee ... Pharmacyclics ... Pavilion Technologies ... Pax Streamline ... PaxVax ... PDL BioPharma ... Pearl Therapeutics ... Pellion Tech ... Peninsula Pharmaceuticals ... Peptimed ... Peptimmune ... Perceptive Sciences ... Permeon Biologics ... Perscitus Biosciences ... Persimmon Technologies ... Pervasis Therapeutics ... Pervasive ... Pfenex ... Pharmacyclics ... Pharmasset ... PhaseBio Pharmaceuticals ...Phase Bioscience ... Phoenix Nuclear Labs ... Phoenix Science ... Phononic Devices ... .. Photobit ... PhotoMedex ... Photonics Innovations ... Photon-X .... PhotoThera .. Photronics ... Phurnace Software ... Phylonix ... Physical Sciences ... Physical Optics ... PhysioGenix  ... PhysioSonics ... .... PhytoTech ... Picolight ... Picometrix ... Piedmont Biofuels ... Pika Energy ... Pinger ... Pinnacle Technology ... Pixel Optics ... Pixim ... Pixtronix ...Planar Energy ... Planar Systems ... Plasan ... Platypus ... PLC Medical Systems ... Plextronics ... Plexxikon ... Plug Power ... Pluromed ... Polatis ... Polychromix ... Polyera ... PolyMedica ... PolyMedix ... Polymer Technology Systems ... PolyPlus ... PolyRemedy ... Polysciences ... Polystor ... Possis Medical ... PowerGenix ... Portola Pharmaceuticals ... Powerlight ...Power Precise Solutions ... PowerVision .... Pozen ... Pranalytica .... Precision Biopsy ... Precision BioSciences ... Precision Optics ... Predictive Biosciences ... Presage Biosciences ... Pressure BioSciences ... Prevention Pharmaceuticals ... Primera Biosystems ... Primorigen Biosciences ... Prism Solar Technologies ... ProCertus BioPharm ... Profectus BioSciences ... Progenics Pharmaceuticals ... Prologic ... Promedior ... Promentis .... Pro-Pharmaceuticals ... Propulsive Wing ... Protein Sciences ... Proteon Therapeutics ... Proteostasis Therapeutics ... Proteotech ... Proteus Biomedical ... Protez Pharmaceuticals ... ProThera Biologics ... Proto Labs ... Proton Energy Systems ... Protonex ... Prototype Productions ... Provagen ... Provenance Biopharmaceuticals ... Proventys ...pSivida ... PTC Therapeutics ... Pulmatrix ... Purfresh ... Pursuit Vascular ... Qcue ... QD Vision ... Qioptiq ... QM Power ... QPixel ... QR Pharma ... Qteros ... Quadra-Aerrow International ... Quadraspec ... ...QualityMetric ... Qualtech Systems .... Qualtré ... Quanterix ... Quantum Epitaxial Designs ... Quantum Fuel Systems ... Quantum Logic Devices ... QuantumSphere ... Quark Biotech ... Quark Pharmaceuticals ... Quick–Med Technologies ... Quidel ... Quincy Bioscience ... Quintessence Biosciences ... Quorum Systems ... Radant Technologies ...Radiabeam Technologies ... Radiant Photonics .. Radiation Monitoring Devices ... RadioMedix ... Radius Health ... Rainbow Organic Farms ... RainDance Technologies ... RainStorm ... Rain Water Solutions .... RaNA Therapeutics ... Range Fuels ... Rapid Diagnostek ... Rapid Micro Biosystems ... Rapiscan ... Raser Technologies ... Raydiance ... Receptor Logic ... Receptos ... Recodagen ... Recombinetics ... ReconRobotics ... Regado Biosciences ... ReGen Biologics ... Regenerative Sciences ... Regulus Therapeutics ... RemoteReality ... Rempex Pharmaceuticals ... Renegade Materials ... Renewable Alternatives ... ... Renovis ...Replidyne ... Repligen ... Rentech ... Research Frontiers ... Resolvyx Pharmaceuticals ... Respicardia ... Response Genetics ... Restoration Robotics ... Rethink Robotics ... Restore Medical ... Retriever Technology ... Reva Medical ... Revegen ... ReVision Therapeutics ... ReVolt Tech ... Rexahn Pharmaceuticals ... ... RF Code ... RFMicron ... RF Surgical ... Rhenium Alloys ... Rhevision ... Rho ... Rhythmia Medical .... Rhythm Pharmaceuticals ... Rib-X Pharmaceuticals ... Ridgetop Group ... RipCode ... Rive Technology ... RJA Dispersions ... R.L. Phillips ... RMH Sciences ... Robopsy ... Robotic FX ... Robotic Technology ... Rocky Research ... RRE Solar ... Rubicon Tech ... Rules-Based Medicine ... Rushford Hypersonic ... RXi Pharmaceuticals ... RxMedic ... Rypos

 

<="" a="">Pacific Biosciences of California

Pacific Biosciences, (Menlo Park, CA; no SBIR) developing disruptive technology to detect biological events at single molecule resolution, said it received grants totaling more than $1.9 million from the National Institutes of Health.  [Silicon Valley/San Jose Business Journal, Oct 8, 09]

Pacific Biosciences (Menlo Park, CA; no SBIR) makes novel use of fluorescent labels that allows it to read long stretches of DNA fragments, base by base, quickly and efficiently. Stephen Turner, the firm’s founder and chief technology officer, is confident that his firm will soon be able to sequence a complete human genome in under 15 minutes. He expects its first commercial product within two years.  [The Economist, Apr 18, 09]

Pacific Biosciences (Menlo Park, CA; no SBIR) is a company that startup people are willing to leave hefty jobs for because it sits on so much potential. ... building a next generation gene-sequencing machine. The goal of the three-and-a-half-year-old company is to bring gene sequencing to the masses ... Over the summer, PacBio raised $100 million in funding in its fifth round of financing.  [Michael Copeland, Fortune, Sep 29, 08]

[The Who's Who of ]Investors are pumping $100 million into a start-up developing technology to propel DNA sequencing into mainstream medicine. The infusion is expected to enable Pacific Biosciences of California (no SBIR) to introduce in 2010 its high-speed system for reading the chemical "letters" of DNA. The technology is designed to expand the use of sequencing to develop treatments tailored to patients' genetic makeup. [Wall Street Journal, Jul 14]

 

<="" a="">Pain Therapeutics

Pain Thera up 10%  [Aug 6, 12]

Pain Therapeutics up 11% [Oct 10, 11]

Pain Thera up 15% [Aug 9, 11]

Pain Thera down 26% [Jun 27, 11]

Pain Thera down 43% [Jun 24, 11]  delayed in gaining U.S. approval for a second time of a new type of painkiller designed to curb drug abuse [Bloomberg, Jun 24, 11]

Pain Therapeutics up 13% [Mar 30, 11]

Pain Therapeutics up 10% [Feb 11, 11]

Pain Therapeutics  down 17% [Jul 7, 09] after its partner for painkiller Remoxy -- King Pharmaceuticals -- said it plans to resubmit a new drug application later than investors had expected. [Wall Street Journal, Jul 8]

Pain Thera down 10% [Mar 5, 09]

Pain Thera up 20% [Mar 3, 09]

Pain Thera down 26% [Mar 2, 09]

Pain Therapeutics down 21% [Dec 11, 08]

An FDA panel on Thursday gave Pain Therapeutics’s tamper-free pain pill mixed reviews. At least 10 members of the Food and Drug Administration panel said Remoxy, the drug developed by Pain Therapeutics and licensed by King Therapeutics Inc., was less likely to be abused than painkillers currently on the market, according to the news agency Reuters.  But eight members said Pain Therapeutics didn’t show that the long-acting, tamper-proof version of the $2 billion painkiller oxycodone would prevent abuse.  [San Francisco Business Times, Nov 13, 08]

Pain Thera  up 11% [Oct 16, 08]

Pain Therapeutics up 12% [Sep 18, 08]

<="" a="">Palmer Labs (Durham, NC)

A giant nonprofit and a technology startup in the Triangle each snagged a slice of a $78 million federal stimulus grant to promote biofuels research. Both grant recipients are hiring engineers, project managers and other scientists for the research efforts. ... Palmer Labs (Durham, NC; no SBIR), 18-month-old, nearly $1.5million .. RTI International $750,000 to study new ways of cooking wood waste [John Murawski, Raleigh News & Observer, Jan 15, 10] Love stimulus? Remember that somebody has to pay for it, and the government has no money of its own.

 

<="" a="">Paloma Pharmaceuticals (Jamaica Plain, MA)

Paloma Pharmaceuticals  (Jamaica Plain, MA; no SBIR) has pulled in $500,000 in a first tranche of a planned $2 million securities offering, according to a regulatory filing. [Mass High Tech, Sep 4, 09]



<="" a="">Panacos Pharmaceuticals

Panacos Pharmaceuticals (Gaithersburg, MA; $3M SBIR) has announced a number of restructuring efforts, including layoffs of seven employees, the closing of the company’s Gaithersburg, Md., facility and the retainment of a financial advisor for the purpose of exploring a possible sale of the company or of its HIV development efforts.  [Mass High Tech, Feb 24, 09]

Panacos Pharmaceuticals said it has sold the rights and assets of bevirimat, a potential HIV drug, for $7 million.  The buyer is another biotech firm, Myriad Pharmaceuticals  of Salt Lake City, Panacos said. [Boston Globe, Jan 21, 09]

Panacos Pharmaceuticals (Watertown, MA; $4.5M SBIR) has laid off 18 employees, about 55 percent of its staff, and has announced that the company’s strategic considerations include financing, partnering or selling the company or its assets, Panacos officials said.   ....  In September, Panacos reported a quarterly loss of $8.2 million on total quarterly revenue of $20,000 [Mass High Tech, Dec 12, 08]

Panacos Pharmaceuticals (Gaithersburg, MD; $4M SBIR) reports it has completed negotiations to sever ties with its former partner Hercules Technology Growth Capital Inc. VC firm Hercules had on Nov. 19 accused Panacos of defaulting on a loan agreement signed in June 2007.  [Mass High Tech, Nov 24, 08]

Panacos Pharmaceuticals(Watertown, MA; $5+M SBIR) has been warned by NASDAQ for being below the buck. [Mass High Tech, Feb 1, 08]

 

<="" a="">Panomics (Fremont, CA)

Affymetrix agreed to buy Panomics (Fremont, CA; $2.3M SBIR) for $73 million in cash. -... Panomics makes products for genetic, protein and cellular analysis. [San Francisco Business Times, Nov 11, 08]

<="" a="">Paper Battery (Troy, NY)

Paper Battery (Troy, NY; no SBIR) , a nanotechnology/energy startup, developing a battery as thin as a piece of paper received a $1 million grant to take the next step in the production process. ... trying to break into the $500 million ultra capacitor market   [Michael DeMasi, Business Review (Albany), Sep 26, 11]

<="" a="">Paradigm Sensors (Milwaukee, WI)

Paradigm Sensors (Milwaukee, WI; no SBIR) will begin production of biodiesel testing devices this year from a new home inside a business incubator ... start-up firm hopes to hire more than 25 people in the coming year as it starts manufacturing handheld devices that analyze biodiesel to ensure product quality ...  will soon close its first round of venture-capital funding after a $200,000 investment announced Tuesday by the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Authority.  [Thomas Content, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Apr 3, 08]

<="" a="">Paragon Dynamics (Aurora, CO)

Mercury Computer Systems  (Chelmsford, MA; no SBIR, market cap $400M) will pay $70 million to acquire a pair of companies that make electronic warfare and intelligence-gathering systems. Mercury is buying KOR Electronics (Cypress, CA; $6.8M SBIR mostly USAF) which makes digital radio and radar test gear, as well as Paragon Dynamics (Aurora, CO; no SBIR), which provides intelligence analysis and exploitation services.  [Hiawatha Bray, Boston Globe, Dec 23, 11]

<="" a="">Paragonix Technologies (Cambridge, MA)

Some Bay State largesse.  The Massachusetts Life Sciences Center, a quasi-public agency tasked with implementing the state’s ten-year, $1 billion Life Sciences Initiative, today announced the awarding of $2.2 million in loans [$750K each] to three early-stage life sciences companies. Intelligent Bio-Systems, (Waltham, MA; $6.3m SBIR)  DNA sequencing company with a patented, higher performance, lower cost, DNA sequencing instrument and consumable system; Allurion Technologies,(Wellesley, MA; no SBIR) company that is developing a novel medical device designed to induce significant weight loss by displacing volume in the stomach. The device can be delivered without surgery and it can be eliminated via an orally available, non-toxic dissolution agent; and Paragonix Technologies,(Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) company that is commercializing first-in-class, single-use and highly portable organ preservation and transport devices called ‘Sherpas.’ Paragonix has begun with a Sherpa for kidney transport, but is planning to expand their ‘Sherpa’ product line for other organs.  [DC Dennison, Boston Globe, Dec 28, 11]

<="" a="">Parasol Therapeutics (Cambridge,MA)

biotech startup Visterra Inc., formerly known as Parasol Therapeutics, (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) has landed $6 million in its first round of funding ... develops technology to “interrogate how pathogens interact with human cells,” which is used to develop diagnostics, vaccines and therapeutics   [Mass High Tech, Jul 12, 10]

<="" a="">Paratek Pharmaceuticals (Boston, MA)

Paratek Pharmaceuticals (Boston, MA; $3.8M SBIR)  signed a worldwide license and commercialization agreement with Novartis, in which Paratek stands to receive up to $485 million in milestone and upfront payments. The agreement centers around Paratek’s antibiotic PTK 0796, currently in Phase 3 clinical trials.  [Mass High Tech, Oct 8, 09]

Paratek Pharmaceuticals (Boston, MA; $3.8M SBIR) closed the $22M first tranche of a $40M private financing to be used to push development of its broad-spectrum antibiotics.  [Mass High Tech, Oct 25]

 

<="" a="">Parion Sciences (Durham, NC)

Parion Sciences (Durham, NC; $1.8M SBIR), working on treatments for pulmonary diseases, received a biodefense grant from the National Institutes of Health worth about $850,000. ... to continue testing of its most advanced experimental medicine to prevent radiation-induced lung injuries after a nuclear incident.  .... founded in 2001 and employs about 10. Its research into diseases that result from a failure of the body's mucosal defenses is based on technology developed at UNC-Chapel Hill.   [Sabine Vollmer, Raleigh News & Observer, Dec 17, 08]

Parion Sciences (Durham, NC; $1.8M SBIR)  has signed a $25 million deal with a Korean company to test an experimental medicine. [Raleigh News & Observer, Oct 29, 08]

<="" a="">Passport Systems (N Billerica, MA)


In its first federal filing in five years, cargo container scanning company Passport Systems (N Billerica, MA; $1.4M SBIR) reports that it’s secured $3.8 million in debt financing out of a $4.5 million offering. .... founded in 2002 to fill the post-Sept. 11, 2001 demand for better ability to tell what’s inside shipping containers in a fraction of the time required by other systems. The company’s website says it has completed preliminary designs for a full-scale NRF scanner with more than $35 million in government and private funding.  In 2009, the company won an $8.6 million contract with its partner American Science and Engineering for development of a system for X-ray analysis of cargo, and later that year, reported that it won a $9.8 million contract for a nuclear detection system with the U.S. Navy.  [Don Seiffert, Mass High Tech, Jun 12, 12]

<="" a="">Pasteuria Bioscience (Alachua; FL)

Pasteuria Bioscience, (Alachua; FL; one SBIR) a venture-backed biopesticide company focusing on the development and commercialization of a platform of natural products for the control of nematodes in agriculture, received the Ag Innovation Showcase “2010 High Yield Business Award.”  [LARTA Vox, Jul 13, 10]

<="" a="">Pathfinder (Cambridge, MA)

Pathfinder (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) cell-based therapeutics firm, and New Jersey biomaterials firm SyntheMed (no SBIR) have merged, the two companies announced   [Mass High Tech, Dec 23, 10]


<="" a=""> PathoGenetix (Woburn, MA)

PathoGenetix (Woburn, MA; no SBIR), which raised $4 million in August, has added $7.5 million to round out its Series B financing, the company announced.   ... first knwon as  U.S. Genomics said it plans to apply the $11.5 million total investment toward development and commercialization of its Genome Sequence Scanning (GSS) technology, aimed at identifying thousands of bacteria strains in one test in three hours.  [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Nov 1, 11]

<="" a="">PatientWise (Middleton, WI)

  Six young Wisconsin bioscience companies have been chosen by the state's biotech trade organization as emerging companies with good growth potential.  The companies have all transitioned successfully out of research and development and are developing commercial products, said Bryan Renk, executive director of BioForward. .... : Fused Innocation  (Neenah; WI) VibeTech (Sheboygan, WI); Somna Therapeutics (Germantown, WI); PatientWise  (Middleton, WI); NanoOncology, a subsidiary of Peptimed (Madison, WI); PharmaSeek Financial Services (Middleton, WI).  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug 30, 12]  None had SBIR.

<="" a=""> Patton Medical Devices (Austin TX)

Patton Medical Devices (Austin TX; no SBIR) raised $15M to step up the national launch of its first product, a "port" through which diabetics inject insulin. ... the company's first [money]  from institutional investors ... has raised about $12M from other investors since its founding in 2004 [Austin American-Statesman, Oct 18]

 

<="" a="">Patton Surgical (Austin TX)

Patton Surgical (Austin, TX; no SBIR) has received $3 million from the Texas Emerging Technology Fund to commercialize its devices, which are used in minimally invasive surgery. Founded in 2002, Patton has developed several devices, including a trocar with a shielded cutting tip. The trocar is used to insert medical instruments into a patient's abdominal cavity during what's known as laparoscopic surgery. [Austin American-Statesman, Oct 23, 09]

<="" a="">Pavilion Technologies (Austin TX)

Pavilion Technologies (Austin   TX; $1.5M SBIR), independent software development, has agreed to be acquired by Rockwell Automation  [Austin American-Statesman, Oct 31]  SBIR advocates often plead that SBIR should help companies remain independent. Nonsense, that is just using taxpayer funds to support companies in the life-style to which they would like to be accustomed.

<="" a="">Pax Streamline (San Rafael, CA)

ARPA-E winners in San Francisco Bay area: Envia Systems (Hayward); NanOasis Technologies (Richmond); Pax Streamline, (San Rafael); and Stanford University. None had SBIR. official list of winners

 

<="" a="">PaxVax (San Diego, CA)

PaxVax, (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) startup backed by Seattle’s Ignition Capital, has raised $2 million of a planned $6 million investment round, according to a document filed with the [SEC]. ... founded in early 2007 to develop new oral vaccine technology based on a common cold virus called the adenovirus.  [signonSanDiego, Nov 9, 09]

<="" a="">PDL BioPharma

PDL BioPharma (no SBIR) fell 32% [Mar 5, 08]. The biotechnology company abandoned plans to sell itself and said it will cut an additional 250 jobs in an effort to reduce costs. [Wall Street Journal, Mar 6]

 

<="" a="">Pearl Therapeutics

Respiratory disease business Pearl Therapeutics (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) raised $15 million in loans that will be converted to equity in its next round of venture funding. [SEF Brown, San Francisco Business Times, Feb 2, 10]

[VC] firm Clarus Venures has invested in $18 M dollar financing of Pearl Therapeutics (no SBIR), a California-based biopharmaceutical company developing products for major respiratory diseases. ..... Pearl, founded in 2006, has raised $36 M of VC and other funding to date.  Nektar Therapeutics (no SBIR) has licensed advanced particle technology to Pearl, and the company it is using to develop technology that will give patients and their health care providers a choice of formulations and dosage strengths of respiratory treatments.  [Mass High Tech, Jul 7, 08]

 

<="" a="">Pellion Tech

Using the computational tools developed by his materials genome project, Pellion, a startup (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR), that he cofounded in 2009, has identified new cathodes for a magnesium-based battery. If it works, Ceder says, the batteries could have double or triple the energy density of today's lithium-ion batteries.  [David Rotman, Technology Review, J/F12]

ARPA-E Awards. The administration announced $106M in ARPA-E stimulus awards. Small biz winners:  Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR) $6M primary;  OPX Biotech (no SBIR) $6M primary; Logos Tech (Arlington, VA; $2M SBIR) secondary; Sion Power (Tucson, AZ; $250K SBIR) $5M primary; ReVolt Tech (no SBIR) $5M primary; PolyPlus Battery (Berkeley, CA; one SBIR) $5M; Pellion Tech (no SBIR) $3.2M primary; A123 Systems  secondary, twice;  Planar Energy Devices (no SBIR) $4M; Maxpower (Harleysville, PA; $9M SBIR) secondary; NanoLab (Newton, MA; $5M SBIR) secondary; Codexis (no SBIR) $4.6M; Nexant (no SBIR) secondary.

Peninsula Pharmaceuticals


Adynxx (San Francisco, CA;  no SBIR) has kept a low profile since its founding five years ago, but is discussing its work publicly today, announcing it has completed enrollment in its initial clinical trial of 30 healthy volunteers. ... supported by a Series A venture financing of $18 million from Domain Associates from 2010, is composed of people who worked together on a series of Domain-backed companies that were acquired, including Peninsula Pharmaceuticals (no SBIR), Cerexa  (no SBIR), and Calixa Therapeutics (no SBIR).  [Luke Timmerman, xconomy,com, Aug 7, 12]


Peptimed (Madison, WI)


Six young Wisconsin bioscience companies have been chosen by the state's biotech trade organization as emerging companies with good growth potential.  The companies have all transitioned successfully out of research and development and are developing commercial products, said Bryan Renk, executive director of BioForward. .... : Fused Innocation  (Neenah; WI) VibeTech (Sheboygan, WI); Somna Therapeutics (Germantown, WI); PatientWise  (Middleton, WI); NanoOncology, a subsidiary of Peptimed (Madison, WI); PharmaSeek Financial Services (Middleton, WI).  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug 30, 12]  None had SBIR.

<="" a="">Peptimmune (Cambridge, MA)

Peptimmune (Cambridge, MA; one SBIR) announced today that it has granted drug maker Novartis an exclusive option to obtain exclusive worldwide rights to develop and commercialize Peptimmune's multiple sclerosis drug candidate.  [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Jan 15] ... could net Peptimmune a half billion dollars and more. [MHT, Jan 16, 09] 

Biotechnology companies in the United States are raising less cash than they have in a decade, in part because of the global economic crisis. The reductions have led to bankruptcies and threaten development of drugs based on biomedical breakthroughs. ... Twenty-five percent of the 370 public U.S. biotechnology companies have less than six months of cash, according to data compiled by the Biotechnology Industry Organization, a trade group in Washington. .... Among others, Peptimmune (Cambridge, MA; one SBIR), a 6-year-old firm, said it is struggling to pay for clinical trials of its multiple sclerosis drug. ... cut its staff more than half, to 22 people; moved to smaller offices to conserve the $6.5 million it has on hand; and is delaying research on drugs for Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, chief executive Thomas Mathers said. ....  On Nov. 10, MicroIslet (San Diego, CA;  $1.8M SBIR) developer of diabetes treatments, and Accentia BioPharmaceuticals (Tampa, FL; no SBIR) sought bankruptcy protection to reorganize, each citing an inability to raise money.   [David Olmos and Rob Waters, Bloomberg News, Dec 1, 08]

Peptimmune (Cambridge, MA; one SBIR) reports it has landed $8.9 million in a second close of a Series D preferred stock offering.  [Mass High Tech, Jul 17, 08]

Peptimmune (Cambridge, MA; one SBIR a decade ago) closed on an $8.2 M first tranche of a Series D funding ... to advance clinical development of Peptimmune's multiple sclerosis treatment, PI-2301 [Mass High Tech, Jan 17]

 

<="" a="">Perceptive Sciences (Austin, TX)

They're trained to know when you're fooling yourself, and by identifying that in their subjects they can help clients get better feedback to develop better products..... Perceptive Sciences (Austin, TX; one SBIR)  with an academic approach to product testing, market research and user experience. ... About a third of Perceptive's work focuses on Web sites, a third on software and a third on gadgets. [Dan Zehr, Austin American Statesman, Mar 3]

<="" a="">PercipEnz Technologies (Madison WI)

Three [Wisconsin] angel investment groups have banded together to put more than $1 M into a Madison software company [PercipEnz Technologies; $1.6M SBIR]  aiming to dramatically expand its clinical data management business. This is the first time several of the groups involved did their due diligence and negotiated terms together, "and that bodes well for bigger deals in Wisconsin," said Charles Goff, general partner of Appleton-based NEW Capital Fund.  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Aug 22]


<="" a="">Permeon Biologics (Cambridge, MA)

 biotech startup Permeon Biologics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) has taken in $2.5 million in an equity and debt financing round ....  looking to develop therapies based on the discovery of a class of proteins that will allow protein-based therapies otherwise too complex to finally get inside a cell wall. The company was founded by Harvard University professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator David R. Liu, also the founder of Ensemble Therapeutics (no SBIR).  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Dec 30, 11]

<="" a="">Perscitus Biosciences (Madison WI)

The Wisconsin Department of Commerce has qualified two biotech companies to receive investor tax credits, the agency said Thursday. Perscitus Biosciences LLC, Madison, is developing a molecule that has shown an ability to protect healthy human cells against the harmful effects of chemotherapy and radiation. HTSS LLC, Milwaukee, is developing a technology that analyzes muscle activity to help reduce injuries during exercise regimens. Certain investors in both companies are now eligible to claim tax credits under legislation known as Act 255. [Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Jun 27]  No SBIR.


Persimmon Technologies (Wakefield, MA)

Persimmon Technologies (Wakefield, MA; no SBIR, founded 2010) which provides direct drive vacuum robotics, has received $2 million in equity financing, according the federal documents. ...  [company's] website says it is the developer, manufacturer, and distributor of atmospheric and vacuum robotics, vacuum modules, and automation systems for a range of industries, including semiconductor, data storage, LED, OLED, solar and flat panel display equipment markets. Its goal is to be the largest vacuum robotics company serving the semiconductor, LED and solar markets by 2020.  [Don Seiffert, Mass High Tech, Mar 21, 12]

<="" a=""> PersonalBee

Technorati agreed to acquire fledgling startup Personal Bee [which] developed a service for people to collect and publish news, information, and entertainment. [RedHerring.com, Apr 13]

 

<="" a="">Pervasis Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA)

Pervasis Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) raised $10 million out of a $17 million third round of financing. ... focuses on creating cell-based compounds and devices. It is also exploring technology in non-vascular applications, such as bone and joint repair, wound healing and inflammation.  [Julie Donnelly, Mass High Tech, Sep 16, 09]

Pervasis Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) secured $9.75M in additional financing. ...focuses on regenerative cell-based therapies and devices [Boston Globe, Jan 16]

Pervasis Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR), developer of cell-based therapies and devices, reports it has nabbed a $9.8M tranche of Series B financing. .. founded 2004 [Mass High Tech, Jan 15]

<="" a="">Pervasive (San Diego, CA)

a new semiconductor startup, courtesy of venture funding from the Bay AreaPervasive, (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) a fabless semiconductor design company that is focused on smart grid applications, raised $6 million from investors, according to a recent filing with securities regulators.  [Bruce Bigelow, signonsandiego.com, Jun 17, 10]

<="" a="">Pfenex

Elevation Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA; no SBIR, founded 2008) startup developing aerosol-based treatments for respiratory diseases, said it has raised a tranched $30 million in Series A venture funding. It’s a sizable round for the [San Diego] life sciences community, but other recent fundings have come close. Last month, VentiRx (no SBIR) raised $25 million, Pfenex (no SBIR) got $24 million, and Zogenix (no SBIR)  got $20 million.  [Bruce Bigelow, signonsandiego.com, Mar 8, 10]

<="" a=""> Pharmacyclics

Pharmacyclics (Sunnyvale, CA; one SBIR two decades ago) has seen its stock quadruple from the beginning of this year. The company has boomed on growing evidence that supports its new drug for blood cancers, ibrutinib, which is designed to selectively block a molecular target called Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk).  [Luke Timmerman, xconomy.com, Jul 9 ,12]

Pharmacyclics up 17% [Feb 13, 21]

Pharmacyclics  up 17% [Feb 10, 12]

Pharmacyclics  up 13% [Feb 9, 12]

Pharmacyclics  down 15% [Dec 9, 11]

Pharmacyclics down 12% [Aug 4, 11]

Pharmacyclics up 11% [Jun 10, 10]

Pharmacyclics up 12% [May 10, 10]

Pharmacyclics down 14% [May 7, 10]

Pharmacyclics up 14% after announcing data from two preclinical studies. [Apr 18, 07]

Hope for FDA reconsideration of Pharmacyclics case had a bad day as the stock dropped 11%.[Apr 10, 07]

Pharmacyclics up 15% after asking the FDA  that its new drug application for a cancer treatment be filed over protest. [Apr 5, 07]

Pharmacyclics dropped 37% after announcing that the FDA rejected a marketing application for the company's drug to treat lung cancer that has spread to the brain. [Feb 21, 07]

<="" a=""> Pharmasphere (Boston, MA)

[Massachusetts] has rescinded $360,000 in tax credits to a fledgling biotechnology company PharmaSphere (Boston, MA; no SBIR) that misled officials about the size of its workforce, the first time such an award has been revoked. ...  has been struggling to raise the $6.5 million in private financing it needs for the project, has yet to receive any of the promised public money. ... claimed on the application that it had 11 to 50 employees. The company later acknowledged it never had those workers. [Todd Wallack, Boston Globe, Dec 25, 10]

 

<="" a="">Pharmasset

Gilead announced a roughly $10.4 billion deal to buy Pharmasset  (Princeton, NJ; $2M SBIR 2000-2003 in Georgia),[up 85%] a company that doesn’t yet have meaningful revenue but is developing treatments for hepatitis C.[Shira Ovida, Wall Street Journal, Nov 21. 11]  HHS has another big econonmic SBIR story.  Would that the other agenices could be so smart in picking techologies and companies with a future.

Pharmasset  down 12% [Nov 4, 11]

Pharmasset up 15% [Aug 9, 11]

Pharmasset up 10% [Jun 8, 11]  on encouraging clinical data, it plans to test its hepatitis C treatment PSI-197 as a stand-alone therapy. Pharmasset is currently testing PSI-197 in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin, two standard treatments for the chronic liver disease. [MarketWatch, Jun 8]

Pharmasset  up 12% [Apr 5, 11]

Pharmasset up 10% [Mar 31, 11]

Pharmasset up 24%  [Mar 7, 11]

Pharmasset  up 10% [Mar 16, 10]

Pharmasset  down 10% [Apr 30, 09]

Pharmasset  up 11% [Apr 29, 09]

Pharmasset  down 10% [Apr 20, 09]  stopped development of Clevudine for hepatitis B in the wake of side effects in long-term users in South Korea, where it already is sold. [Wall Street Journal, Apr 21]

Pharmasset  up 10% [Apr 8, 09]

Pharmasset  up 11% [Mar 26, 09]

Pharmasset up 12% [Mar 17, 09]

Pharmasset  up 14% [Mar 23, 09]

Pharmasset up 12% [Mar 12, 09]

Pharmasset up 15% [Mar 3, 09]

Pharmasset down 19% [Feb 25, 09]

Pharmasset up 15% [Oct 16, 08]

Pharmasset up 15% [Oct 14, 08]

Pharmasset up 26% [Oct 13, 08]

Pharmasset down 12% [Oct 10, 08]

Pharmasset up 10% [Mar 13, 08]

Pharmasset  up 17% [Jan 16, 08]

Pharmasset up 12%. [Jan 15, 08]

Pharmasset up 33% [Jan 8, 08] after the company announced positive data from a short-term early stage study on its hepatitis C candidate, R7128

Pharmasset rose 14% after saying it will receive a $7.5M payment from Roche for a collaboration on hepatitis C treatment research

Pharmasset which IPO'd Apr 27,07 is holding its price. 14 HHS SBIR Phase 1s over $100K.

<="" a="">PhaseBio Pharmaceuticals (Morrisville, NC)

PhaseBio Pharmaceuticals (Morrisville, NC; no SBIR)  has raised about $8 million to date in two rounds of financing  [Triangle Business Journal, Nov 13, 09]

 

<="" a="">Phase Bioscience (Durham NC)

PhaseBio Pharmaceuticals (Durham, NC; no SBIR) raised $25 million in a series B round of financing, the company announced ...  developing therapies based on its proprietary technology with proteins that can be used to enhance the delivery of therapeutic drugs. [Triangle Business Journal, Jan 7, 10]

Phase Bioscience (Durham NC: $200K SBIR) raised $6.6M in its most recent round of financing. [Raleigh News&Observer, Oct 25]


 

<="" a="">Phoenix Nuclear Labs (Monona, WI)

Phoenix Nuclear Labs (Monona, WI; no SBIR) said it has completed a $590,500 round of equity fundraising to continue developing its particle accelerator technology.  ... is collaborating with Shine Medical Technologies and the Morgridge Institute for Research to develop a new process for producing molybdenum-99, a medical isotope used in medical imaging procedures. [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, May 21]

<="" a=""> Phoenix Science (Chelmsford, MA)

Phoenix Science & Technology (Chelmsford MA) got a $15M Phase III Navy SBIR for more development of pulsed light and acoustic devices for for ultraviolet water treatment and for paint stripping of naval vessels. [Mass High Tech, Aug 26]  Navy mainline takes advantage of sole-source rules for SBIR awardees to ease its contract administration. It means juicy contracts for the good (Navy likes them) companies. The one downside to that policy is that Navy will favor companies ready for large contracts for Phase 1 and 2.  Phoenix has at at least $3.5M of Navy SBIR since 1995



<="" a=""> Phononic Devices (Raleigh, NC)

The White House held up a small [17 employees] company as an example of the success of its policy. Phononic (Raleigh, NC; no SBIR) scored $3 million from the U.S. Department of Energy two years ago and earlier this year netted $12 million in private investment. ... develops semiconductor devices that capture and recover waste heat and could tap a rich source of energy.  [John Murawski, Raleigh News & Observer, Aug 31, 11]

Phononic Devices 
(Raleigh, NC; no SBIR) startup that makes miniature electronic heat pumps has scored $10 million in venture capital to create prototypes of its product for demonstration to potential customers. ... with 10 employees at its Centennial Campus office, plans to hire up to 20 scientists and engineers in the next 18 months as it ramps up production of its thermodynamic devices, CEO Anthony Atti said.  The 2-year-old company is developing a product designed at Oklahoma University to replace conventional equipment that removes heat from computer and refrigeration components. In the past two years, Phononic won a prestigious $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy and $2 million in venture capital. The first $5 million went into research, development and design. The latest round of venture financing will pay for further testing and assembly of prototypes. [John Murawski, Raleigh News & Observer, Feb 24, 11]

 

<="" a=""> Photobit (Pasadena, CA)

Photobit Acquired. Photobit (Pasadena, CA) was quietly acquired by Micron Technology in Micron's run at the emerging CMOS image sensor market. No price reported. eNews says at least 20 chipmakers are believed to be producing or developing CMOS image sensors, though no single supplier is considered entrenched.. Photobit, a JPL spinoff acquired key patents to the JPL technology and some government contracts, especially SBIR from (then) BMDO , Then it needed deep pockets volume manufacturing capacity, and the know-how to optimize a process technology for cost and performance. Enter Micron, which claims that combining Photobit's IP with its process expertise will enable high resolution in a small pixel size to significantly reduce chip size, cost, and power consumption, Frost & Sullivan estimated the 2001 image sensor market, including CCDs, at about $1 billion.

 

<="" a="">PhotoMedex (Montgomeryville, PA)

PhotoMedex  (Montgomeryville, PA; no SBIR) has raised $2.7 million in a private stock placement. ... develops proprietary excimer laser and fiber optic systems for the treatment of skin disorders [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Oct 23, 09]

 

<="" a="">Photonics Innovations (Birmingham, AL)

Laser systems maker IPG Photonics (Oxford, MA, founded 1990; no SBIR) has acquired Photonics Innovations (Birmingham, AL; one SBIR) a maker of active and passive laser materials and tunable lasers.  [Mass High Tech, Jan 26, 10]


<="" a="">Photon-X (Huntsville, AL)

Lucidux LLC  (Providence, RI; no SBIR), a startup that makes 3-D imaging technology for surgery and other medical applications, has received $250,000 in funding from the Slater Technology Fund, a non-profit corporation that works like a venture capital firm ... founded in 2011, is developing its technology with corporate partner, Photon-X (Huntsville, AL; $6M SBIR)  The real-time, three-dimensional imaging of internal organs and tissues uses software-enhanced presentation and can be used by surgeons during procedures such as laparoscopy and arthroscopy. The company says it can highlight diseased tissue, allowing surgeons to remove it without damaging healthy tissue nearby.  [Don Seiffert, Mass High Tech, Jul 30, 12]


<="" a="">PhotoThera (Carlsbad, CA)

Dr. Jackson Streeter once held the ultimate cool job. In the mid-1990s he was the first medical doctor to be a pilot in the elite U.S. Navy Fighter Weapons School, more commonly known as TOPGUN ... he gave it all up in May, 1997, to start a company, PhotoThera (Carlsbad CA; no SBIR), built around an unlikely laser therapy he learned about from an obscure Hungarian medical journal.  ... His device, called NeuroThera, is still in clinical trials, but it is gaining respect from stroke specialists and once-skeptical venture capitalists. ...managed to drum up $750,000 in financing from Hamilton BioVentures and California Technology Ventures in 2001, in part by crashing a Goldman Sachs investment meeting in San Diego. Positive data in animals helped him raise an additional $4.35 M, then $19 M more, and finally in 2006, $30.5 M. [Catherine Arnst, Business Week, Nov 19

 

<="" a="">Photronics (Brookfield, CT)

Photronics (Brookfield, CT; no SBIR)  reports it plans to raise more than $85 million in a public stock offering ... to repay some of its outstanding bank loans ...   imaging technology company  [Mass High Tech, Sep 11, 09]

 

<="" a="">Phurnace Software

Phurnace Software (Austin, TX; no SBIR),18-month-old company, which sells software that accelerates the deployment of Java applications, completed its $5 million first round of venture backing. [Austin American-Statesman, Jul 21]

Two Austin startups,30 Second Software Inc. and Phurnace Software Inc., have received venture capital infusions. 30 Second Software, founded by Austin entrepreneur Dave Sikora, has raised $2.9 million from two corporate investors, to develop mobile commerce technology and services. Phurnace, which won the 2006 University of Texas MOOT Corp business-plan competition, received $1.3 million [from] a Texas-based venture fund affiliated with Draper Fisher Jurvetson.  [Austin American-Statesman, Sep 3]

<="" a=""> Phylonix

A Fish for All Seasons. Phylonix Pharmaceuticals (Cambridge, MA; $8M HHS zebrafish SBIR) got a two-year EPA contract for up to $4.3M to explore the use of zebrafish as a screening tool.

Doing Its Thing.  NSF handed Phylonix a $500K Phase 2 SBIR  to assess possible toxic effects of chemicals on the development of human organs and tissues using tests performed in zebrafish. The company calls itself a Contract Research Organization providing in vivo zebrafish assays.

 

<="" a="">Physical Optics (Torrance, CA)

Ceradyne got $436M in government contracts in  2006, says fedspending.org's database. Physical Optics $21M.

Loving Experience.   Scientific Systems (Woburn,MA; $50M+ SBIR) won a NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIR for Distributed Formation State Estimation Algorithms Under Resource and Multi-Tasking Constraints. Creare (Hanover NH; $120M SBIR) won four NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIRs. Intelligent Automation (Rockville MD; $100M SBIR) won three NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIRs. Physical Optics (Torrance, CA; $200M SBIR) won one NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIR. Radiation Monitoring Devices (Watertown, MA; $90M SBIR) won one NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIR. Etc, etc, etc. A zillion start-ups all over America got letters saying there was not enough money to nurture their ideas.

Physical Optics (Torrance, CA), still a private firm after 15 years of SBIR and 322 Phase 1s through 1998 (if the SBA database is current) spun off its fourth subsidiary to focus on commercial products" But SBIR cheerleaders should ask why POC hasn't had a BMDO Phase 2 since 1994 alongside its tons of military service awards. It did have three Phase 2s from DOE last year.

POC's website claims POC’s rapid growth has been achieved through a successful commercialization strategy based on in-house manufacturing, corporate alliances, licensing and joint ventures. POC also has a long and successful history of converting technologies developed under Federal SBIR programs into commercial products. This conversion has been accomplished using multimillion dollar venture capital investments, and strong banking relationships and allows us to capitalize on both commercial & government growth opportunities. With our unique expertise, $10 million in assets, and a strong growth record, POC is well positioned to become a major player in the rapidly growing optoelectronic markets.  You may notice that the website has little useful data (it's a private corporation) by which anyone could evaluate whether SBIR was getting its money's worth. POC has managed over the years of SBIR to never go public despite being in a hot industry.

 

<="" a="">Physical Sciences (Andover, MA)

Physical Sciences, a huge consumer of SBIR, bought Q-Peak  to get Q-Peak's solid-state laser systems which would complement and support PSI's activities in laser applications.

Lucent signs cascade-laser sales deal. US-based technology-development company Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) has signed a deal with Lucent Technologies to develop and sell gas sensors that are based on quantum cascade lasers (QCL). PSI says that, with prototype sensors already under development, the devices will be available for delivery by the middle of the year. The QCL sources operate between 5 and 12 µm, which corresponds to the fingerprint molecular-absorption region of many common and pollutant gases. PSI has also licensed patents and technologies from Gemfire, based in California, which has developed periodically poled lithium niobate crystals to convert laser emissions in the visible and near-infrared into the 2 to 4.5 µm region. Gas sensors for water-vapour and hydrocarbon detection that are based on these sources are also under development at PSI.Together with the QCL-based sensors, PSI will be able to cover the spectral range from the visible through to the far-infrared.

Alan Gelb of Physical Sciences Inc  (Andover, MA) got a BMDO Phase 2 for a versatile, charge-free atom beam tool for semiconductor processing. The tool uses PSI's proprietary microwave-driven plasma beam technology..... In the Phase II program, the oxygen beam will be developed into a processing tool capable of meeting the uniformity and cleanliness requirements for the 300 mm wafer fab. Addtionally, chlorine atom and CF4/02 beams will be generated, characterized and demonstrated for metal and chamber cleaning applications. The proposed program will be carried out in collaboration with a major equipment manufacturer to assure the development of a commercial tool. . How nice an oxygen beam! Alan Gelb and PSI got the first SDIO Phase 2 in 1986 for ... an oxygen beam. Wonder what PSI has done in the intervening decade about commercializing its beam technology? Ask CEO Bob Weiss why he wants more and biger SBIR with all the present management schemes (without co-investment) that he so often taps. What is PSI's ROI for all that government investment? Maybe holding his feet to a co-investment fire was the only way to force realistic proposals.

 

<="" a=""> PhysioGenix (Wauwatosa, WI)

start-ups in the drug field within the Milwaukee 7 economic development region suggests another strategic direction for the regional economy. Those new ventures come as Concordia University of Wisconsin mounts an impressive campaign to build a new pharmacy school in southeastern Wisconsin, possibly in downtown Milwaukee. ... New ventures  in the emerging drug-making concentration:  MPP Group  (no SBIR), a venture headed by serial entrepreneur Frank Langley that is building drugs aimed at alcoholism. James Cook, a University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee researcher, developed the compounds.  Neuro Amp (no SBIR), a spin-off from PhysioGenix (Wauwatosa, WI; $3M SBIR) that is aiming at diseases of the central nervous system and Alzheimer's.  Promentis (no SBIR), a collaboration between Marquette University's David Baker and UWM researchers and former Schwarz Pharma managers who are targeting schizophrenia and central nervous system disorders.  Cytometix (no SBIR) , a 2004 start-up headed by Lane Brostrom that is developing drugs for the treatment of pain and asthma. Endece  (no SBIR), a 2006 Mequon start-up headed by James Yarger that is developing compounds for treating cancer, sepsis, learning and memory. [John Torinus, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan 31, 09]

PhysioGenix (Wauwatosa, WI; $3.5M SBIR) which sells pre-clinical services to drug companies, said it plans to spin off a subsidiary that will attempt to create drugs out of compounds developed at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan 18, 09]

<="" a="">PhysioSonics (Seattle, WA)

PhysioSonics, (Seattle, WA; no SBIR) a University of Washington spinout company that's developing an ultrasound device to monitor blood flow in the brain, has raised $2 million in funding to move toward commercialization of its first product. [Puget Sound Business Journal, Jun 24, 09]

<="" a=""> PhytoTech (Monmouth Junction, NJ)

A Real Industrial Plant  PhytoTech (Monmouth Junction, NJ) is on the verge of parlaying one SBIR into an industry. Whereas most companies bleat that environmental technology is too much potential and too little immediate earnings prospects (and therefore needful of government succor), last week it filed for an IPO to raise $11M for the "bio-technology" of using metal-loving plants to capture metals from the soil. PhytoTech has one 1997 Army SBIR to absorb uranium from Army-contaminated ranges. The same hyper-uptake principle would work also for hydroponic culture to remove metals from flowing water. One warning: don't eat the leaves. In late 1994, the company raised more than $3 million US in private placement venture capital. Of this, $1.1M was committed to Rutgers for research to be conducted. Field trials have been conducted in Chernobyl, Ukraine, in Sheffield, England, and in Trenton, NJ.  PhytoTech's market success is likely to depend on three things: the bureaucracy of getting government to buy such a product, the economics of finding better uses (like concentrating trace metals for pharmaceutical supplements), and the general market attitude to biotech companies. Michael Gianturco (financial pundit) [Bloomberg Personal, May 98] says biotech is where digital was in the 1970s. That is, stocks are unpredictable and therefore dangerous, a situation where the best thing about this sector is also the worst  That alone scares conservative investors and bureaucrats. Gianturco also notes more optimistically that Molecular biology is to the second half of the 20th century what physics was to the first half: a springboard for a torrent of widely used commercial applications.The SBIR deciders MAY note the potential or they may just simply use the technology for cleanup as a pure service contract. Their imaginations can be put to the test.

 

<="" a=""> Picolight (Boulder, CO)

<="" a="">

Picolight Boulder, CO) did a cross-licensing deal with Honeywell for its “oxide confined” VCSELs.  Picolight started life in 1996 with an BMDO SBIR, got seven Phase 2 SBIRs 1997-2000 and now employs 100 people. Companies like Picolight, with entrepreneurs like Jack Jewell, and products like the next generation VCSELs make the perfect SBIR start-up situation.

Picolight's 100 employees testify that the company has made exemplar use of a little SBIR money and a wad of venture capital sine starting up in 1995. Its latest news is that it made the first 1310nm transceivers out of its signature product - VCSELs. Six Phase 2 SBIRs in the late nineties was all the government R&D help he needed. It is actually founder Jack Jewell's second such rise to success, having pulled the same trick after starting Vixel in 1991.If there was ever a poster child for SBIR, Jack makes the ideal candidate on the basis of getting somewhere with an infant technology an only a little bit of government money. $5M of SBIR attracted $80M of private investment which by its nature expects a high ROI which in turn requires really large sales volume. If the technology really works in the marketplace - no small trick - the return to the government in corporate income taxes alone will be among the largest ROI government ever gets from intruding in the marketplace. The stories that the federal agencies tell of sales volume by SBIR companies is small potatoes to ROIs like Jack Jewell's. But Jack will have to get his reward from the private market because the government is disinterested in adjusting its SBIR to bet on more Jack Jewells.

Picolight (Boulder, CO) raised another $27M of venture capital to keep its 120 employees developing transceiver subsystems for short-reach (1-meter to 20-kilometer) optical-networking connections. That makes $80M raised since 1996. Picolight’s specialty is the Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser (VCSEL) deriving from Jack Jewell's work first at Bell Labs, then at his co-founded Vixel before he founded Picolight. Both Vixel and Picolight got their funding starts from SDIO/BMDO's SBIR, back when BMDO cared about co-investment and entrepreneurs.

Picolight (Boulder, CO) says it part of a 14 company initiative for a next generation 10GB pluggable fiberoptic transceiver. And as soon as Nortel and Lucent and Corning pick themselves out of the overbuilding cellar, .... [fact from Laser Focus World, Jun01]

Picolight (Boulder, CO) took down $10.8M in VC funding in the fall of 1999, says Photonics Spectra Apr00. Picolight is the second child of Jack Jewell who first co-founded Vixel.. He got both started with SBIR from BMDO, Vixel in 1991 and Picolight in 1996. PS calls it a manufacturer of VCSEL devices. Vixel went public in 1999 but is presently languishing well below its first trading range.

Picolight $3.5M  Jack Jewell closed a $3.5M investment in two-year old Picolight (Boulder, CO) to develop the next generation of VCSELs. That funding on the top of three BMDO Phase 2 SBIRs brings his capital influx to about $8M. Jack tells how he got the first $250K to match the Fast Track $1M: One night a stranger knocked at his door up a long track from the road in the mountains above Boulder looking for Jack's wife who had published a scientific article on x-ray lithography. Her address was on the paper byline. He was interested in investing in it until Tanya said that it was really long term stuff but "by the way have you heard about Jack's new company?"

Picolight's VCSELs Light Up. Having won a BMDO Fast Track as a deserved reward for attracting private capital to a BMDO technology - next generation VCSELs - Picolight (Boulder, CO) also won two regular-way Phase 2 awards, also with rewards for new capital. Of course, from BMDO they are not just a handout of an R&D contract. They require an escalating match rate by private capital as both the technology and the company mature. BMDO did the same thing for the first company Jack Jewell founded - now Vixel Corp - which has raised tens of millions to go into full scale production. From the FT which had 4:1 (BMDO to private), the second has 2.5:1, and the third 0.7:1. BMDO also holds out the idea of expanding the amount if Picolight finds investors. BMDO's message: if you can't find investors </b>in your technology as it technically matures, you're kidding yourself about its potential in which case we will cut our losses.

Picolight Fast Track. A DOD Fast Track award is on its way to Picolight (Boulder, CO) for a shot at the next generation of vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, manufacturable oxide-defined VCSELs, that would dramatically upgrade instruments such as CD and DVD pickups, datacom transmitters, barcode scanners, printers, gas sensors and telecom 1.3 micron transmitters. Since Picolight just got started by Jack Jewell, one of the founders of Vixel (Broomfield, CO) and an alumnus of Bell Labs, it qualified for a 4:1 match of whatever third party cash it could recruit. Such recruiting is rarely easy for the kind of new technology that BMDO favors. (BMDO knows it cannot reach its technology dreams with safe incremental advances to present technology and thus bets on some risky stuff that VCs avoid.)

Vixel (and Jewell) got started with a BMDO (then SDIO) SBIR in 1991 and has since raised more than $30M to get a VCSEL industry rolling. Jewell said on a 1994 BMDO SBIR video that his dream was "to walk  into a consumer electronics store and see his products on every shelf";. Jewell now has a two-way play in VCSELs: he wins if Vixel sells a zillion of today's VCSELs and/or if Picolight sells a zillion of tomorrow's VCSELs. He's basically betting that his new venture will overtake his first venture. He has to decide which to hope for: Vixel's establishing a market whose next generation Picolight can exploit faster than Vixel can OR Picolight's leafrogging Vixel straight into a second generation technology before the first even recovers its investments.  BMDO and Jewell win either way. He's probably hoping more for the latter because the capital raising and the multiple founders of Vixel well  diluted his equity share. Still, even a small percent of a giant win makes him a winning entrepreneur. If he's economically rational and capitalistic, he'll root for the biggest pile of money

Jack's dreams can also be inferred from his November 1991 Scientific American article Microlasers in which Vixel is called by its first name, Photonics Research Inc. Jon Baron, DOD's Fast Track champion says that 75% of all Fast Track awards have gone to 4:1 matches that can only be had by first time Phase 2 winners under 10 employees.

 

<="" a=""> Picometrix (Ann Arbor, MI)

<="" a="">

Advanced Photonix up 10% [Oct 23, 07] after announcing that its subsidiary, Picometrix, has received a follow-on $750K AF Phase II SBIR for further non-destructive testing (NDT) application development involving the testing of radomes for defects such as delaminations and water intrusion utilizing the T-Ray 4000 terahertz system platform. [company press release]  Picometrix started life in 1992 with an SDIO SBIR when Steve Williamson got fed up with his university's handling of patenting his work.

Picometrix (Ann Arbor MI) got some national press [Business Week, Apr 11] for trying to develop a terahertz people scanner. Pico started life (as Picotronix) with 1992 SBIR from SDIO for Steve Williamson's launch from the cozy but bureaucratic university lab situation, and has had six Phase 2s to help along its commercial ventures in super-fast lasers. I didn't have to talk too hard to Steve to convince him that he was great SBIR material of the mettle I was looking for in the high-tech days of Star Wars.  It calls itself a leading supplier of high-speed optical receivers and ultrafast instrumentation since 1992.  Recently it said it was being bought for $12M by Advanced Photonix, another 1980s SDIO-SBIR winner.   Co-founder Rob Risser said the firm has been profitable every year of its existence except the IT crash years of 2002 and 2003. Half a million profit in 2004 on $7.5M revenue.  [facts from Scott Anderson, The Ann Arbor News, Mar 25, 05]

 

<="" a="">Piedmont Biofuels (Pittsboro, NC)

Thirteen NC companies will split $1 M from a new state fund intended to help businesses create environmentally friendly technologies. In the Triangle area: Ecocurrent of Raleigh received $100,000 to convert hog manure into electric power; Kyma Technologies of Raleigh received $60,000 to work with N.C. State University on a more efficient, cheaper electric switch.; 3F LLC of Raleigh received $100,000 to develop a natural fiber-reinforced concrete formula.; Piedmont Biofuels of Pittsboro received $75,000 to work on a reactor that more efficiently creates biodiesel.; Nextreme Thermal Solutions of Durham received $57,319 to manufacture a generator that converts waste heat into electricity.; Rain Water Solutions of Raleigh received $18,000 to develop a new rain barrel manufacturing process. [Raleigh News & Observer, Jul 1]



<="" a="">Pika Energy (Gorham, ME)

Maine Technology Institute today announced four new Development Awards — conditional loans — totaling $761,348 for four Maine technology companies. The awards by MTI, a publicly financed non-profit, were matched with combined contributions over $890,047 by the recipients: Wizbe Innovations (Manchester, ME)  $64,000 to develop parachute fabric for the U.S. Army with controllable and adjustable permeability. Wizbe initially began their work with a U.S. Army SBIR to develop a prototype fabric. ...  Pika Energy (Gorham, ME; no SBIR)   $274,291 to develop a wind turbine system that offers lower upfront costs to make it easier and less expensive for families and businesses to produce clean renewable electricity. Early stage development was supported with an MTI Seed Grant.   ...  Cerealus Holdings(Waterville, ME; no SBIR) $261,849 to commercialize their Cerecarb, which is designed to enable paper mills to reduce costs by substituting ash filler for expensive pulp fiber. ...  RainStorm(Orono, ME; no SBIR) $161,208 to expand access to affordable education opportunities nationally by providing local adult education programs with a simple, affordable course catalog and online registration website.   [Mass High Tech, Jun 27, 11 

<="" a="">Pinger

 Ten Startups to WatchInstant Voicing by Pinger Founded 2005, Funding $11 million;  Sharing, Privately by Pownce  founded 2007 funding undisclosed; Cell-phone Streaming by Qik founded 2006 funding $4M;   Traffic Master by Dash Navigation founded 2003 $71M; Crisis Sourcing by Ushahidi founded 2008 funding undisclosed;  Partial Recall by QTech founded 2004 $5M; Are You ... Influential? by 33Across founded 2007, $1M;  Semantic Ads by Peer 39, 2006, $11M;  Mashups Made Easy by Mashery, 2006, $5M; Video Packet-Switching by Anagran, 2004, $40M. [MIT Tech Review, J/A08]

<="" a="">Pinnacle Technology

Kansas Grappling Also. Kansas bioscience leaders took steps toward stimulating collaboration between companies and university researchers pursuing new drug technology, biomaterials and plant genetics. The Kansas Bioscience Authority signed off on three planning grants totaling $580,000 for the potential creation of new bioscience centers of innovation. That initiative, investments in companies such as XenoTech (no SBIR) and Pinnacle Technology (Lawrence KS; $2M+ SBIR) and providing up to $7M toward the recruitment of two renowned scientists are the latest examples of how Kansas is attempting to bolster its bioscience economy, said Sandra Lawrence, chairwoman of the authority’s board. [Jason Gertzen, Kansas City Star, Jan 17]

<="" a=""> Pixel Optics

Seeing Only the Forest. Almost everybody (93%) on the planet over the age of 45 suffer from presbyopia, says PixelOptics http://www.gravitysedge.com/pixeloptics/home.htm , where people have trouble picking the bones out of the fish plate Pixel just got a DOD contract for goggles that would correct a warrior's vision "We're aiming for 20/8," says company R&D chief Dwight Duston. Eileen Zimmerman [Wired, Jun 06] stuck a knife in the claim by noting that Duston was also former head of research for Star Wars, so improved ability to actually hit anything is not guaranteed.  He was also the grand poobah of Star Wars SBIR which got a lot of interesting innovations their first serious money. He comes to Pixel by way of the VC operation The Egg Factory.  In his ten plus years at Star Wars, he ran the office that put the earliest money into anything new, although as the project matured from a pure exploration into a development, the ratio of pure science to SBIR kept shrinking.  For SBIR he provided the shield from internal politics that undercuts every other agency program and steers money into immediate tasks and away from disruptive innovation. I picked the winners and losers and he kept the hyenas from the food supply.

 

<="" a=""> Pixim (Mountain View, CA)

In-Q-Tel's strategic investment funding will be used to accelerate Pixim (Mountain View, CA; no SBIR)'s new product development and for general working capital purposes to meet the strong growth arising from demand for Pixim chipsets. ...  known for its award-winning, patented Digital Pixel System® (DPS) technology and for setting the industry standard for wide dynamic range image capture in the security camera market [In-Q-Tel press release]

 

<="" a="">Pixtronix (Andover, MA)

Pixtronix (Andover, MA; no SBIR) picked up $19 million in a new round of equity and warrants, and may have brought in a major cell phone maker as a new strategic investor ... founded in 2005 by CTO Nesbitt Hagood, and is developing improved electronic displays designed to consume less power. The company unveiled its first product, PerfectLight, in November of 2008 [Mass High Tech, Dec 29, 09]

Pixtronix (Andover, MA; no SBIR) emerged form secrecy to unveil its new MEMS display technology. ...  raised $31M in two rounds.  [Mass High Tech, Nov 7]

<="" a="">Planar Energy (Orlando, FL)

Planar Energy (Orlando, FL; no SBIR)—a company spun out of America’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory in 2007. The firm is about to complete a pilot production line that will print lithium-ion batteries onto sheets of metal or plastic, like printing a newspaper. [The Economist, Jan 29, 11]

<="" a="">Planar Systems

Planar down 18% [Apr 28, 10]

Planar  down 11% [Feb 3, 10]

Planar  up 11% [Feb 2, 10]

Planar  up 21% [Feb 1, 10]

Planar  down 13% [Jan 29, 10]

Planar Sys up 12% [Jan 4, 10]

Planar Systems up 10% [Jul 22, 08]

Planar Systems up 12% [Jul 16, 08]

Planar Systems down 14% [Apr 29, 08] on earnings disappointment.

Planar Systems up 10% [Feb 26, 08]

 

<="" a=""> Plasan (Bennington, VT)

 Plasan  (Bennington, VT; no SBIR) ) that manufactures products for the auto and defense industries has bought a Massachusetts design company.....  announced a deal to buy KaZaK (Woburn, MA; $40+M SBIR over 15 years). Plasan describes KaZaK as a leader in composite structures and low-cost, automated composite manufacturing. The Bennington Banner reports that Plasan CEO Dan Ziv says KaZaK will help Plasan boost its manufacturing capability. Plasan North America in Bennington produces armor for military vehicles. Plasan Carbon Composites makes auto parts. [AP, Jul 1, 11]

<="" a=""> Platypus (Madison, WI)

A $2.2 million contract with a U.S. Army research center could bring [Platypus Technologies, Madison, WI; $8.5M SBIR] one step closer to its goal of making a portable sensor that detects deadly gases and other toxins. ... U.S. Rep. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.) helped the company secure the funds in the DOD Appropriations bill for fiscal 2010, ... "Platypus is a company that goes out and meets people in the federal government. Like Orbitec and Oshkosh Truck, they're out there talking to people on a regular basis," said Jack Heinemann, director of the Wisconsin Security Research Consortium, which works to get more lucrative, classified defense contract work into Wisconsin.  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan 6, 10]  Will the Wisconsin Republican Congresscritters complain about homegrown corruption in government the same way in complains about Obama's irresponsible government finance? 

Jeff Williams will make his first-ever pitch to venture capitalists this month,  marketing a business with enormous potential that is operating at the intersection of biotech and nanotechnology. Platypus Technologies (Madison WI, nearly $7M SBIR) has exclusive rights to 13 patents that cover the use of liquid crystals for sensors and other detection devices. The Madison company employs 18 people. [Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Sep 18]  Nice technology, I suppose, but why did HHS SBIR put in $7M without noticeable private investment? Just what is SBIR's objective? Will HHS ever be called to account for its ROI on SBIR?

Two Wisconsin businesses will receive state funding for technology development:  NovaScan (Milwaukee) $50K for technology to measure the electrical properties of materials used to identify tissue types in the body, and Platypus Technologies (Madison) $50K for nanotechnologies for the life sciences. [Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Oct 17]  Platypus has hauled in about $7M in SBIR.

 

<="" a="">PLC Medical Systems (Franklin, MA)

PLC Systems (Franklin, MA; no SBIR) has closed $6 million in secured convertible debt financing expected to help the Franklin medical device technology firm reinstitute clinical trials for its RenalGuard system. [Mass High Tech, Feb 23, 11]

Plenty of medical companies are sharing Muller's pain. PLC Medical Systems (Franklin, MA; no SBIR) canceled a scheduled clinical trial last fall of a new hydration and urine collection system to protect patients with impaired kidneys from the side effects of X-ray procedures. "We had the hospitals and patients ready to go," said Mark R. Tauscher, the company's president and chief executive.  [Barnaby Feder, NY Times, Apr 5, 09]

<="" a="">Plextronics

Plextronics (Pittsburgh, PA; $300K SBIR) said it will partner with a Dutch organization on organic light emitting diode technology.  ....said in a news release that it and Holst Centre would team up on research for what it called "game-changing technology that opens the door to many possible lighting applications in living and working environments."  [Paul Gough, Pittsburgh Business Times, Aug 28, 12]

 Innovation Works, Hazelwood (PA) VC fund, in 2007 invested $6.1 M in technology companies, including its 100th investment.  The  specializes in giving a leg up to young technology companies cites three [no SBIR] success stories: Knopp Neurosciences, which is working on a drug therapy to slow the advance ALS ("Lou Gehrig's disease"). ... granted "orphan drug" status by the FDA ; Printed electronics manufacturer Plextronics, which attracted more than $20 M in new investment last year and set an efficiency record with its solar cells;  Thorley Industries signed a $215 M deal with Hasbro for that company to manufacture and sell a new line of Thorley products  [Elwin Greene, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 2].

Plextronics, a Pittsburgh start-up developing organic photovoltaic technology for solar power, said it has raised $20.6M in a second round  [Matt MarshallVenture Beat, Sep 5]

<="" a="">Plexxikon (Berkeley, CA)

Plexxikon (Berkeley, CA; $300K SBIR in the 1990s) hit the motherlode last week when it agreed to be acquired for $805 million upfront, plus $130 million in milestones, by Japan-based Daiichi Sankyo.  ...  after raising just $67 million. That’s the kind of return VCs live to see [Luke Timmerman, xconomy.com, Mar 7.11]

 

<="" a="">Plug Power

Pork is a handout to someone else. Sen Schumer said Thursday that fuel-cell funding that would benefit Plug Power (Latham, NY) cleared a hurdle and was headed to the full Senate.  .... Plug CEO said the funding was also critical “to accelerate the use of fuel cells in early market applications.”   [The Business Review (Albany), May 8]  Where is the market failure that needs government intervention?

Plug Power's two billionaire Russian shareholders are unwinding their partnership investment in the Latham [NY] fuel-cell company. ... The two men partnered in a company called Smart Hydrogen Inc. that invested $217M in Plug in 2006, a move that allowed the company to acquire two Canadian fuel-cell companies last year. [Larry Rulison, Albany Times-Union, Apr 26]

<="" a="">Pluromed (Woburn, MA)

Pluromed (Woburn, MA; $1.5M SBIR) said the (FDA) has approved its LeGoo surgical gel to temporarily stop blood flow, and that it plans to expand its staff and manufacturing space over the next year. ... already has been selling the gel for a couple years in Europe, where it has the CE Mark and where it has been used in more than 1,000 surgical procedures including beating heart surgery (coronary artery bypass without the use of a heart-lung machine), bypass of the leg (in patients treated for peripheral vascular disease), and microvascular reconstruction.  [Lori Valigra, Mass High Tech, Oct 7, 11]

Pluromed (Woburn, MA; $1.5M SBIR) medical device company, has raised $1.1 million of a planned $3.9 million funding round, according to federal documents. With a total of $7.25 million raised over three previous rounds, Pluromed has now taken in almost $8.5 million in funding, federal documents showed.  ...  Founded in 2003, Pluromed was one of the first seven recipients the Accelerator Program loans, directed by the Massachusetts Life Sciences Center [Mass High Tech, Apr 23]

Pluromed (Woburn, MA; one SBIR) said it has entered into an alliance with Boston Scientific Corp., the large Natick-based medical device company, to distribute one of its products.  ... focused on the use of gel plugs in medical procedures; its products are used in cardiac, vascular, prostate, and liver surgery as well as to treat kidney stones. [Boston Globe, Oct 9, 09]

<="" a="">Polatis (Andover, MA)

Polatis (Andover, MA; no SBIR) said it has raised $8 million in venture capital. .... specializes in all-optical switch technology. [Boston Globe, Jun 2,09]

 

<="" a="">Polychromix (Wilmington MA)

Polychromix (Wilmington, MA; $600K SBIR) an innovative developer of material analysis and chemical sensing technologies, announced a strategic investment and development agreement with In-Q-Tel [company press release, Oct 1, 07] 

Polychromix (Wilmington MA; $600K SBIR) which employs 20 people, develops a handheld device designed to analyze various materials for the U.S. military and intelligence agencies, got an investment from In-Q-Tel (CIA's VC) which also plans to help Polychromix commercialize its technology for a range of government security agencies.  [Mass High Tech, Oct 1, 07]

 

<="" a="">Polyera (Skokie, IL)

NIST TIP winners  $22 million in funding for nine research projects targeting innovative manufacturing technologies in fields ranging from biopharmaceuticals and electronics to renewable energy sources and energy storage:  Isogenis (Aurora, CO; $4.8M SBIR);  ActaCell,  (Austin, TX; no SBIR);  Engineered BioPharmaceuticals (Manchester, CT; no SBIR); Arsenal Medical  (Watertown, MA; no SBIR); Kent Displays (Kent, OH; $2.6M SBIR); Precision BioSciences (Research Triangle Park, NC; $340K SBIR); Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR); Sinmat (Gainesville, FL; $4.4M SBIR); Polyera (Skokie, IL; no SBIR).  http://www.nist.gov/tip/tip_121510.cfm 

<="" a="">PolyMedica (Wakefield, MA)

 PolyMedica (Wakefield, MA; 2 Phase 1 SBIRs), provider of products for diabetics, has agreed to be acquired by a giant pharmacy benefits manager,  Medco Health Solutions for about $1.5 B cash.

 

<="" a="">PolyMedix (Radnor, PA)

PolyMedix (Radnor, PA; $8M SBIR) said it has stopped enrollment in two clinical trials for its new drug candidate PMX-60056 because of observations of reductions in blood pressure in some study patients.  [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, May 10, 12]

PolyMedix (Radnor, PA; $4.2M SBIR) and the University of Massachusetts received a $750,000 [Army STTR] contract ... to conduct further testing on [multidrug resistant biofilm-embedded bacteria ]antimicrobial compounds [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Nov 16, 10] raised $20M in stock offering Nov 09

PolyMedix (Radnor, PA; $4.5m SBIR) received a $986,000 phase-II NIH grant to support the company’s development of antimicrobial compounds to treat a mouth infection. [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Sep 30 , 10]

PolyMedix (Radnor, PA; $3.6M SBIR) announced a public equity offering of up to $21 million. ... for development of an antibiotic and a heparin antagonist  [Philadelphia Business Journal, Nov 11, 09]

<="" a="">Polymer Technology Systems (Indianapolis, IN)

Polymer Technology Systems (Indianapolis, IN; no SBIR),  a diagnostic medical device maker, won Innovation of the Year for a line of products to rapidly determine cholesterol rates and other levels in blood.  The Mira Awards are sponsored by Techpoint. The private company founded in 1992 has sales representatives and/or distributors worldwide.[Indianapolis Star, May 19]

 

<="" a="">PolyPlus (Berkeley, CA)

PolyPlus Battery (Berkeley, CA; one 1999 SBIR) has landed a nearly $9 million investment from the U.S. Department of Energy to scale up production of new kinds of batteries.....  will ramp up production of advanced lithium-air, lithium-water and lithium-sulfur batteries.... to produce the batteries at factory scale, ... to extend the driving range of electric vehicles.[George Avalos, Oakland Tribune, Jun 12, 12]  founded 1991 ... 27 employees including 7 PhDs [company website] Why government money for what should be an ROI investment?  faces one big technical problem: Its lithium-air battery can be recharged just 40 to 50 times, vs. thousands of times for traditional lithium-ion batteries [Alexandra Dean, Bloomberg Business Week, Apr 5, 12]  DOE is desparately pushing efficient batteries for the political dream of a nationwide adoption of electric autos in the windstorm of private market resistance.

ARPA-E Awards. The administration announced $106M in ARPA-E stimulus awards. Small biz winners:  Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR) $6M primary;  OPX Biotech (no SBIR) $6M primary; Logos Tech (Arlington, VA; $2M SBIR) secondary; Sion Power (Tucson, AZ; $250K SBIR) $5M primary; ReVolt Tech (no SBIR) $5M primary; PolyPlus Battery (Berkeley, CA; one SBIR) $5M; Pellion Tech (no SBIR) $3.2M primary; A123 Systems  secondary, twice;  Planar Energy Devices (no SBIR) $4M; Maxpower (Harleysville, PA; $9M SBIR) secondary; NanoLab (Newton, MA; $5M SBIR) secondary; Codexis (no SBIR) $4.6M; Nexant (no SBIR) secondary.

PolyPlus  (Berkeley, CA; $100K SBIR a decade ago)  is developing lightweight, high-energy batteries that can use the surrounding air as a cathode.  is partnering with a manufacturing firm to develop single-use lithium metal-air batteries for the government, and it expects these batteries to be on the market within a few years. The company also has rechargeable lithium metal-air batteries in the early stages of development that could eventually power electric vehicles that can go for longer in between charges.  [Katherine Bourzac, MIT Tech Review, Jun 26, 09]

<="" a=""> PolyRemedy

PolyRemedy (no SBIR) said that it closed a $20 million Series C financing. ... focused on integrated wound management systems.  [Boston Globe, Jun 7, 11]



<="" a=""> Polysciences (Warrington, PA)

Polysciences (Warrington, PA; $200K SBIR long ago) raised $4 million in a debt offering completed Wednesday, according to [SEC] documents ... maker of laboratory products and specialty monomers/polymers for microscopy, histology, biotechnology, electronics and other industrial applications. ...  founded in 1961, last month opened an office in Taiwan to expand its global presence. [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Oct 20, 11]

<="" a=""> Polystor

UltraCell  (Livermore, CA; $800K SBIR) will get $1 million from the state of Ohio to help move more of its manufacturing operations to the Dayton region. .. has production operations in the area, recently landed a $3 million contract [funded by stimulus dollars] with the USAF to develop portable fuel cells for use by soldiers in the field.  ...  raised $3.8 million in venture funding to help expand operations at its facility in Dayton. ... has raised $30 million total since it was started in 2002 [Dayton Business Journal, Dec 18, 09] launched with technology licensed from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories ...  [In 2007] it planned to invest $74M in the Dayton operation. The state has promised $15.2M in loans, grants and tax credits.  [Dayton Business Journal, May 15, 07]  portfolio.com lists James Kaschmitter as Chairman & CEO. Kaschmitter had a battery firm Polystor ($500K SBIR in 1996) and founded PowerStor (no SBIR) in 1997 as a spin-off from PolyStor [allbusiness.com, Dec 99].

Wha'ppen Polystor? The story is simple and heart-warming for government R&D types. Polystor started life with a DARPA contract that allowed the founder to skip out of Livermore Labs (which was looking for ways to de-populate). A BMDO Phase 2 SBIR followed which induced a British company to toss in money which led to a mass production Army contract in 1999 plus $9.5M from the Advanced Battery Consortium and an ATP grant. PolyStor was the first Li-ion battery producer in the United States and the first to use a nickel cobalt oxide cathode that delivers the highest capacity and energy density in the industry, says Branscom et al. In winter 2001 the firm employed roughly 150 people, with a staff of 35 in research and development. In 2002, Polystor ceased operations. Sweet story ends. Which suggests several hard questions for the government advocates:  1) Why did all that government money not produce a sustainable economic winner? ; 2) Is the battery powered vehicle still a government pipe-dream?; 3) Did the government ever ask whether that technology at that price could survive in a competitive market place especially in a company nurtured by government handout?; 4) How much government money is too much?

<="" a="">Portola Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA)

Accumetrics (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) develops, manufactures, and markets the VerifyNow® System, a comprehensive suite of tests for the assessment of platelet response to antiplatelet therapies. ...  signed an agreement with Portola Pharmaceuticals, (South San Francisco, CA; $500K SBIR) to develop and supply the VerifyNow System and VerifyNow Tests for use in clinical trials. [Accumetrics company press release] has raised $24 million from investors since 2009 .. employs 70 people [signonsandiego.com, Mar 2, 11]

 

<="" a="">Possis Medical

Possis Medical (Minneapolis; $250K SBIR) up 35% [Feb 11, 08] as it sold itself to Bayer for $344M.

 

<="" a="">PowerGenix (San Diego, CA)

in hybrid vehicles like the Toyota Prius and the Ford Focus. When they're stopped, so are their engines. When the driver presses down on the accelerator, powerful batteries start the engine and move the car Dan Squiller, chief executive of Scripps Ranch-based battery maker PowerGenix (no SBIR), is betting that technology will spread to other cars too, as it has in Europe. ... a good match for the nickel-zinc rechargeable batteries PowerGenix has been developing over the last decade.  [Onell Soto, signonsandiego.com, May 25, 11]

Army's venture venture.  The Army's VC (OnPoint Tech) current investment portfolio : A123 Systems (Boston, MA; $750K SBIR, IPO 2009) advanced Lithium-Ion based cells for rechargeable battery packs;  Atraverda (UK) advanced bi-polar battery electrodes for rechargeable batteries;  Integrated Fuel Cell Technologies  (Burlingto MA; no SBIR) next generation fuel cell systems for portable devices;  Nanosolar (Palo Alto, CA; $1.7M SBIR) thin-film solar technology for roll-to-roll printing of solar cells on flexible substrates,   PowerGenix (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) next-generation rechargeable batteries; Power Precise (Herndon, VA; no SBIR) a fabless semiconductor company specializing in battery management devices; Ultra Cell (Livermore, CA; no SBIR) integrated fuel cell systems; Zinc Matrix Power (Santa Barbara, CA; no SBIR) high-performance rechargeable alkaline battery technology for commercial and military markets;  Akermin (St Louis, MO; no SBIR) portable fuel cells based on its proprietary “Stabilized Enzyme Biofuel Cell” SEBC™ technology; Superprotonic (Pasadena CA; $200K SBIR) solid acid fuel cell.  [defense-ventures.com]  No surprise that a VC, even one doing it for the government, sees tech opportunity much different than does Army SBIR. I note that the three outside trustees (of five trustees) of OnPoint are a DOD political appointee, and entrepreneur/attorney, and Paul Gompers from Harvard Business School who with Josh Lerner publish a lot of venture research. Lerner did a lot of SBIR study until, I presume, he gave up on SBIR's ever being anything but a political handout.

PowerGenix (San Diego, CA; no SBIR; founded Y2K) is still a pip-squeak, having raised only $61 million from venture capitalists and praying for revenue of $10 million this year. ...  In December it began selling its AA rechargeable nickel-zinc batteries in Ritz Camera stores. It now has agreements to deliver $70 million worth of its batteries over the next three years to makers of power tools, garden tools and electric scooters and bicycles; shipping starts this fall. The attraction: Zinc is plentiful, nontoxic, recyclable and enables production of batteries with a high rate of discharge. ...  Says Lux Research Senior Analyst Ying Wu, "PowerGenix is the cheaper option, for now, and it has strong performance." But if the price of lithium-ion cells drops, Wu says, PowerGenix will be challenged.   [Kerry Dolan, Forbes, May 11]

Zinc Power. PowerGenix (San Diego, CA) landed a $17M round of financing in November ... For the past few years, PowerGenix has been developing a battery that it says is as much as 75% lighter, 30% smaller and 10 times as powerful as existing nickel-cadmium or nickel-metal hydride batteries. [Wall Street Journal, Jan 29, 07] No SBIRs yet.

<="" a=""> Powerlight (Berkeley CA)

Powerlight, of Berkeley, CA, a large venture-backed solar installer, ..just won a contract to help build the world's largest solar photovoltaic power project: a 11-megawatt solar power plant in Serpa, Portugal. [http://www.siliconbeat.com/, Apr 29, 06]

<="" a=""> Power Precise Solutions

Army's venture venture.  The Army's VC (OnPoint Tech) current investment portfolio : A123 Systems (Boston, MA; $750K SBIR, IPO 2009) advanced Lithium-Ion based cells for rechargeable battery packs;  Atraverda (UK) advanced bi-polar battery electrodes for rechargeable batteries;  Integrated Fuel Cell Technologies  (Burlington MA; no SBIR) next generation fuel cell systems for portable devices;  Nanosolar (Palo Alto, CA; $1.7M SBIR) thin-film solar technology for roll-to-roll printing of solar cells on flexible substrates,   PowerGenix (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) next-generation rechargeable batteries; Power Precise (Herndon, VA; no SBIR) a fabless semiconductor company specializing in battery management devices; Ultra Cell (Livermore, CA; no SBIR) integrated fuel cell systems; Zinc Matrix Power (Santa Barbara, CA; no SBIR) high-performance rechargeable alkaline battery technology for commercial and military markets;  Akermin (St Louis, MO; no SBIR) portable fuel cells based on its proprietary “Stabilized Enzyme Biofuel Cell” SEBC™ technology; Superprotonic (Pasadena CA; $200K SBIR) solid acid fuel cell.  [defense-ventures.com] No surprise that a VC, even one doing it for the government, sees tech opportunity much different than does Army SBIR. I note that the three outside trustees (of five trustees) of OnPoint are a DOD political appointee, and entrepreneur/attorney, and Paul Gompers from Harvard Business School who with Josh Lerner publish a lot of venture research. Lerner did a lot of SBIR study until, I presume, he gave up on SBIR's ever being anything but a political handout.

The Army is about to start using technology that measures the remaining power in batteries, developed by Herndon, Va.-based PowerPrecise Solutions, which received an investment from [Army VC] OnPoint in March 2004. The Army expects to save $65 million a year with the new product. It has put $61.8 million into the fund since Congress mandated its creation in the fiscal 2002 Defense Appropriations Act. .. The other Army "VC" investments: higher power density fuel cell system based on generating hydrogen from highly concentrated methanol for use in portable electronics (UltraCell); advanced rechargeable batteries based on silver zinc (Zinc Matrix Power);thin-film solar technology (Nanosolar).  [Kimberly Palmer, GovExec, May 15]


<="" a=""> PowerVision (Belmont, CA)

PowerVision (Belmont, CA; no SBIR) that is developing a new kind of lens for the eye closed on $24 million in financing by several backers, including Medtronic ... is developing an an intraocular lens, which is implanted in the eye. The idea is to restore the eye’s ability to adjust its focus. The company will use the funds to expand its research and development efforts and for a clinical trial in Europe. None of its products are as-yet approved for sale. [Janet Moore, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Jul 15, 11]

<="" a=""> Pozen (Chapel Hill, NC)

A small Chapel Hill (NC) drug maker is teaming up with one of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies to create a painkiller that would neutralize a nagging side effect: stomach ulcers.  As part of the deal, Pozen would receive up to $375M in payments and bonuses from AstraZeneca, which is based in London. If the drug wins U.S. regulatory approval for patient use, Pozen also stands to earn even more in sales royalties through 2023. The company's stock jumped nearly 40% on Wednesday's news.  Pozen, a 10-year-old company with 35 employees, is demonstrating a talent coveted by many drug startups in the Triangle: attracting major corporate firepower to back experimental medicines. [Raleigh News and Observer, Aug 3]  No SBIR record.

<="" a="">Pranalytica (Santa Monica, CA)

Pranalytica (Santa Monica, CA; $500K SBIR) started as a developer of sensors for analyzing human breath for disease, but is now leading the quest to make small lasers that can knock down antiaircraft missiles. ... [Founder] At age 60, C. Kumar N. Patel had a resume of accomplishments few scientists could match. In a span of four decades, Patel invented the carbon dioxide laser, which revolutionized manufacturing and surgical procedures, obtained 38 patents and ran the physics and engineering departments at Bell Labs, a premier research operation historically attached to AT&T ...  left the relative comfort of academia, tapped his life savings and started a tiny technology company ....   Amid the rising concern about terrorists using chemical weapons, the Pentagon began looking for reliable, portable devices that could be used to detect chemical agents and explosives. Patel's technology looked promising. In 2004, the Defense Department awarded the company a $13-million grant. ...  Since that 2008 breakthrough with the anti-missile laser, Pranalytica has grown to 15 employees.  [Peter Pae, Los Angeles Times, Jan 26,09]

 

<="" a=""> Precision Biopsy

Allied Minds, a Boston-based investment firm specializing in early-stage university ventures, has partnered with the University of Colorado to establish Precision Biopsy LLC, which is developing an optical biopsy needle to be used in diagnosis of prostate cancer.  [Denver Post, Jul 16, 08]

<="" a="">Precision BioSciences (Research Triangle Park, NC)

NIST TIP winners  $22 million in funding for nine research projects targeting innovative manufacturing technologies in fields ranging from biopharmaceuticals and electronics to renewable energy sources and energy storage:  Isogenis (Aurora, CO; $4.8M SBIR);  ActaCell, (Austin,TX; no SBIR);  Engineered BioPharmaceuticals (Manchester, CT; no SBIR); Arsenal Medical (Watertown, MA; no SBIR); Kent Displays (Kent, OH; $2.6M SBIR); Precision BioSciences (Research Triangle Park, NC; $340K SBIR); Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR); Sinmat (Gainesville, FL; $4.4M SBIR); Polyera (Skokie, IL; no SBIR).  http://www.nist.gov/tip/tip_121510.cfm 

<="" a=""> Precision Optics

Precision Optics (Gardner, MA; $400K SBIR two decades ago) has formed a deal with Intuitive Surgical Operations Inc., a surgical robotics firm in California, bringing $2.5 million to Precision Optics. ...  said it plans to continue pursuing its technology outside of medical robotics, focusing on its Lenslock endoscopes, Microprecision optical elements and handheld stereoendoscopes.   [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Aug 5, 11]

Precision Optics (Gardner, MA; $500K SBIR) sold its optical filter line to a New Jersey company for $250,000 and a three-year royalty agreement  [Mass High Tech, Jan 22, 08]

Precision Optics which had a sliver of HHS SBIR money in the late 80s is in danger of de-listing for lack of $1 stock price for 30 days. 

Precision Optics, a bit HHS SBIR played in the late 80s, raised another $5M in a rights offering to buy the $1.30 stock at $1


<="" a="">Predictive Biosciences (Lexington, MA)

Predictive Biosciences (Lexington, MA;  no SBIR) announced the completion of a $25 million Series C round of growth capital financing. ... describes itself as a commercial stage, fully-integrated developer of novel molecular diagnostic cancer assays and a provider of anatomic pathology laboratory products and services  [Boston Globe, Jun 16, 10]

Predictive Biosciences (Lexington, MA; no SBIR) closed on a $21.75 million Series B financing to fund clinical trials for its oncology testing assays. The -based firm stated it would use the capital to develop its urine-based test that can detect the presence of cancer. The firm plans to launch a multi-center clinical trial for patients with recurring bladder cancer in 2009. A portion of the money will also be used to establish a new independent laboratory. [Mass High Tech, Oct 16, 08]


<="" a=""> Presage Biosciences (Seattle, WA)

Presage Biosciences (Seattle, WA; no SBIR) said in a regulatory filing that it has raised $1.6M of an equity financing that could be worth as much as $10.5 million over time. Presage, a spinoff from the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, has some cool technology for helping separate the winners from the losers in the early stages of drug development. It has previously raised at least $4 million  [Luke Timmerman, xconomy.com, Aug 11, 11]

 

<="" a=""> Pressure BioSciences (South Easton, MA)

Pressure BioSciences  (South Easton, MA, one SBIR), a 2009 Larta NIH-CAP company focused on the development of novel instruments and solutions to the error prone nature of biological sample preparation, has recently entered in to a distribution agreement with Netherlands-based LA Biosystems BV to market and sell their instruments in Belgium, the Netherlands, and Luxembourg. This follows on the coattails of a collaboration with the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science and international co-marketing and distribution agreements with KeraFAST LLC (USA), Digilab Inc. (USA), OROBOROS (Austria) and IUL Instruments GmbH (Germany).  [LARTAVox,  Mar 21, 12]

Pressure BioSciences (South Easton, MA;  one SBIR) completed an $800,000 private placement  ...   to support commercialization of its Pressure Cycling Technology platform, which uses rapid cycles of hydrostatic pressure between ambient and ultra high levels to control biomolecular interactions.    [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Feb 9, 12]

On the heels of receiving $112,000 in loans from three of its investors, Pressure BioSciences (South Easton, MA; one SBIR) was awarded [$650K DOD SBIR] ... help fund the development of an automated, high-throughput, high-pressure system, including instruments and consumables, for safe and accurate processing of pathogenic organisms such as viruses and bacteria. [Lori Valigra, Mass High Tech, Oct 14, 11]

Pressure BioSciences (South Easton, MA; one SBIR)  was awarded a $649,498 [SBIR] grant from the U.S. Department of Defense....  will help fund the development of an automated, high-throughput, high-pressure system, including instruments and consumables, for safe and accurate processing of pathogenic organisms such as viruses and bacteria. The system will be based on the company’s pressure cycling technology, which uses rapid cycles of hydrostatic pressure between ambient and ultra high levels to control biomolecular interactions. ... a substantial portion of the remaining development costs of a new system aimed at the sample preparation market. He estimated the size of that market at $6 billion, including approximately 80,000 laboratories and 500,000 researchers worldwide. [Lori Valigra, Mass High Tech, Oct 14, 11]  Sounds an awful lot like merely reducing business risk for a working technology which competes with private capital and enters the territory of corporate welofare.  Ah well, DOD likes certainty in its spending.

Pressure Biosciences (no SBIR) has pulled in $1.2 million through a combination of equity, warrants and securities.  [Mass High Tech, Dec 4, 09]

Pressure BioSciences (South Easton, MA; no SBIR) sold about $1.16 million in stock and warrants, as a first tranche of a $2.5 million private placement. [Mass High Tech, Nov 19, 09]

Pressure BioSciences (South Easton, MA; no SBIR, 27 employees) has announced restructuring steps, including a 40 percent reduction in workforce, closing of a research facility in Rockville, Md., and widespread cost reductions  ... will focus on Pressure Cycling Technology (PCT) for the mass spectrometry market, as well as the biological sample preparation market. Other company projects not related to the new strategy will be terminated.  [Mass High Tech, Dec 2, 08]

<="" a="">Prevention Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT)

Prevention Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT; no SBIR) has sold $650,000 of a $2 million securities offering, through a combination of debt, options and warrants .... to introduce an OTC zinc-salts heartburn gel cap called Acid-Fix that is based on technology out of Yale University [Lori Valigra, Mass High Tech, Jan 13, 11]

 

<="" a=""> Primera Biosystems

Primera Biosystems (Mansfield, MA; no SBIR) reports it has closed on a $20 million Series C round of financing, ... a molecular diagnostics company developing a proprietary nucleic acid analysis system [Mass High Tech, Sep 21, 09]

Molecular diagnostics company Primera Biosystems (Mansfield, MA; no SBIR) closed on a $21M Series B financing led by a British investment firm ... has operated quietly since it closed an $11M Series A financing in 2005. [Mass High Tech, Jan 8, 08]

<="" a=""> Primorigen Biosciences

Primorigen Biosciences LLC got a Phase I SBIR grant of $362,714 from NIH. The grant allows the Madison biotech company to compete for an additional $1.6 million grant in the future, company executives said. Primorigen is developing new antibodies and other products for cell therapy research. ... will accelerate Primorigen’s development of a new protein detection test to support cell research on Type I diabetes, the company said.  [Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Sep 4, 08]

 

<="" a=""> Prism Solar Technologies (Lake Katrine, NY)

solar-power startups in particular have seen a three-year surge, from a low of no venture investment in the third quarter of 2005 to a high of more than half a billion dollars in the second quarter of this year.  CaliSolar (Sunnyvale, CA; no SBIR) $13M; Wakonda Technologies (Fairport, NY; $200K SBIR) $9M; Prism Solar Technologies (Lake Katrine, NY; no SBIR) $9M. [Dean Takahashi, MIT Tech Review, S/O 08]

 

<="" a="">ProCertus BioPharm (Madison, WI)

Other [Wisconsin] companies the MoneyTree report showed raising venture funding in the second quarter were: Aquarius Technologies (Port Washington, WI; no SBIR) developer of wastewater treatment technologies, $4 million; NeuWave Medical (Madison, WI; no SBIR) medical device company, $2.63 million; ProCertus BioPharm (Madison, WI; $1.6M SBIR) drug developer, $1.7 million; and Zurex Pharma (Madison, WI; no SBIR) drug developer, $1 million.  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jul 19, 11]

ProCertus BioPharm (Madison, WI; $1.6M SBIR) has raised $1.7 million to fund clinical trials to determine whether its products can safely help cancer patients avoid side effects of radiation and chemotherapy. ... ProCertus' products are applied to skin or the inside of the mouth minutes before cancer therapy to protect cells that will be exposed to chemotherapy and radiation.  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Apr 5, 11]

ProCertus BioPharm  (Madison, WI; $1.6M SBIR), developing drugs to protect cancer patients from common chemotherapy and radiation side effects will announce Tuesday it has raised $2.1 million. ...  has also started enrolling patients in a clinical trial to determine whether its DermX product prevents burns caused by radiation therapy, said Paul Weiss, the company's acting chief executive officer. ....  ProCertus licenses its technology from the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation. The company raised $2.3 million in 2007. [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jun 30, 09]

<="" a="">Profectus BioSciences (Baltimore,MD;

Profectus BioSciences (Baltimore, MD; $1M SBIR) was awarded a total of $6.25 million in funds from the [NIH]. ...includes three SBIR grants totaling $2.9 million. ... develops vaccines for chronic viral diseases  ... grants are in addition to $4.4 million the company recently secured. Those funds included an SBIR grant of $3.1 million ...   an HIV and cancer research company, is a spinout from the Institute of Human Virology formed to commercialize research spearheaded by Dr. Robert C. Gallo, the famed AIDS co-discoverer who oversees the institute. [Emily Mullen, Baltimore Business Journal, Oct 7, 10]

 

<="" a="">Progenics Pharmaceuticals

Progenics Pharma down 50%  [Jul 30, 12]

Progenics Pharma  up 31% [Dec 20, 11] after [Progenics and Salix] said a late-stage study for an expanded use of the constipation treatment Relistor yielded positive results. [AP, Dec 20]

Progenics Pharma  up 21% [Nov 30, 11]

Progenics Pharma up 15% [Oct 4, 11]

Progenics Pharma up 10% [Aug 29, 11]

Progenics Pharma  up 11% [Aug 15, 11]

Progenics Pharma up 12% [Aug 11, 11]

Progenics Pharma up 16% [Aug 9, 11]

Progenics Pharma down 11% [Aug 4, 11]

Progenics Pharma  up 11% [Sep 22, 10]

Progenics Pharma  up 13% [Jul 21, 10]

Progenics Pharma  down 10% [Jul 16, 10]

Progenics Pharma up 11% [May 26, 10]

Progenics Pharma up 12% [May 12, 10]

Progenics Pharma up 11% [Nov 16, 09]

Progenics Pharma down 11% [Jun 22, 09]

Progenics Pharma  down 12% [Apr 20, 09]

Progenics Pharma  up 14% [Mar 26, 09]

Progenics Pharma  up 11% [Mar 23, 09]

Progenics Pharma up 14% [Mar 12, 09]

Progenics Pharma  down 21% [Dec 1, 08]  On a stock bloodbath day

Progenics Pharma down 11% [Nov 14, 08]

Progenix Pharma down 10% [Oct 22, 08]

Progenics Pharma up 11% [Oct 13, 08]

Progenics Pharmaceuticals which dropped more than 60% when its lead drug, Relistor, failed a phase 3 trial last month for postoperative ileus, a constipation-like condition that follows abdominal surgery.  Then the stock jumped more than 30% in the other direction yesterday after the drug was recommended for approval in the European Union for treating opioid-induced constipation (OIC), and is trading up another 26% today after the FDA approved it last night. In fact Progenics has roughly tripled since I said investors had overreacted to the failed drug study. [motleyfool.com, Apr 25, 08]

Progenics Pharmaceuticals up 22%, topped the list of Biggest Percentage Price Gainers on the Nasdaq. Wall Street Journal, Apr 22]

Progenics Pharmaceutical up 19% after the company said its Relistor constipation drug was approved for sale in Canada.  [AP, Apr 1, 08]

Progenics Pharmaceuticals down 63% after the company and its partner Wyeth said their constipation drug failed a late-stage clinical trial. [AP, Mar 12, 08]

Progenics Pharmaceuticals up 10% [Jan 8, 08]

 

<="" a=""> Prologic

Efficient Ears. On average, companies generated roughly $28 in earmark revenue for every dollar they spent lobbying. By any standard, that's a hefty ratio: The companies in the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index brought in just $17.52 in revenues for every dollar of capital expenditure in 2006. ... Says Keith Ashdown, chief investigator for the watchdog group Taxpayers for Common Sense: "The lion's share of these projects is about politics and jobs, rather than real needs." [Business Week, Sep 17]  The earmark efficiency champ is an SBIR company, Scientific Research (Atlanta GA and others; about $15M SBIR), that got $344 in earmarked funds per dollar of political "investment".Other SBIR investors: Isothermal Systems (KY and WA; $2M SBIR) at $221 per lobbying dollar; Prologic (Fairmont WV; $2M SBIR) at $133 per dollar; Trex Enterprises (San Diego CA; $7M SBIR) at $116 per dollar. From an efficiency viewpoint, politicians make a good investment. You just have to learn how to kiss frogs.


<="" a=""> Promedior (Malvern, PA)

Promedior  (Malvern, PA. no SBIR) raised $21.5 million in a first closing of a series D round of venture capital financing  [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Mar 7, 12]

<="" a=""> Promentis (Milwaukee, WI)

Promentis Pharmaceuticals   (Milwaukee, WI; $500K SBIR) developing drugs to treat schizophrenia and other central nervous system disorders said Thursday it has raised $1.94 million from investors. [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Feb 26, 10]

Promentis Pharmaceuticals (Milwaukee, WI; $500K SBIR; founded 2006) will receive a $250,000 Technology Venture Fund loan from the state Department of Commerce to continue development of pharmaceuticals that treat psychiatric, behavioral and neurological disorders. ... initially focused on the development of a new class of antipsychotic medications for the treatment of schizophrenia. [Business Journal of Milwaukee, Feb 11, 10]

start-ups in the drug field within the Milwaukee 7 economic development region suggests another strategic direction for the regional economy. Those new ventures come as Concordia University of Wisconsin mounts an impressive campaign to build a new pharmacy school in southeastern Wisconsin, possibly in downtown Milwaukee. ... New ventures  in the emerging drug-making concentration:  MPP Group  (no SBIR), a venture headed by serial entrepreneur Frank Langley that is building drugs aimed at alcoholism. James Cook, a University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee researcher, developed the compounds.  Neuro Amp (no SBIR), a spin-off from PhysioGenix (Wauwatosa, WI; $3M SBIR) that is aiming at diseases of the central nervous system and Alzheimer's.  Promentis (no SBIR), a collaboration between Marquette University's David Baker and UWM researchers and former Schwarz Pharma managers who are targeting schizophrenia and central nervous system disorders.  Cytometix (no SBIR) , a 2004 start-up headed by Lane Brostrom that is developing drugs for the treatment of pain and asthma. Endece  (no SBIR), a 2006 Mequon start-up headed by James Yarger that is developing compounds for treating cancer, sepsis, learning and memory. [John Torinus, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan 31, 09]

<="" a="">Pro-Pharmaceuticals

Pro-Pharmaceuticals  has closed a $6 million private placement  [Mass High Tech, May 12, 10]

<="" a="">Propulsive Wing (Syracuse, NY)

Most Innovative Technology ... at the 10th Annual SmartStart UNYTECH Venture Forum–– Propulsive Wing, (Syracuse, NY; no SBIR) developing an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform.  [Business Review (Albany), May 19, 10]

<="" a=""> Protein Sciences (Meriden,CT)

Protein Sciences facing possible bankruptcy and liquidation has been awarded a $35 million federal [HHS] contract to develop a faster way to make vaccines for pandemic influenza. ...  But only a day earlier, creditors filed a petition in federal bankruptcy court seeking to force Protein Sciences into bankruptcy and liquidation, saying they were owed $11.7 million. Almost all of that money is owed to Emergent BioSolutions, a vaccine company in Rockville, Md., that lent Protein Sciences $10 million last year in advance of the pending acquisition of virtually all the assets of Protein Sciences by Emergent. The acquisition deal fell apart, and Emergent sued Protein Sciences and its top executives, accusing them of fraud and breach of agreements. [Andrew Pollack, New York Times, Jun 23]

Protein Sciences claimed breach of contract in cancelling its sale to Emergent BioSolutions which counter-claimed that Protein Sciences had no legal right to end the deal on its own, calling the claims "baseless.".  [Wash Post, Jul 30, 08]

Protein Sciences (Meriden, CT; $900K SBIR) came out slugging, saying a lawsuit by its merger partner was an attempt to cripple the maker of a next-generation flu vaccine, forcing it into bankruptcy so it could be bought more cheaply. Emergent BioSolutions is backing out on millions of dollars in loans that it agreed to make as part of a merger agreement in May, Protein Sciences said in a press release. The loans are critical to keeping the cash-strapped company afloat while it pursues licensing and further work on its FluBlok vaccine.  [Kenneth Gosselin, Hartford Courant, Jul 11, 08]

Emergent BioSolutions, in a push to diversify beyond its biodefense business, plans to announce today that it is buying Protein Sciences (Meriden, CT; $900K SBIR), a maker of a next-generation flu vaccine that federal regulators have put on a fast track to approval. for $75M [Kendra Marr, Washington Post, May 27]

 

<="" a=""> Proteon Therapeutics (Waltham, MA)

Proteon Therapeutics  (Kansas City, MO; $250K SBIR), a developer of drugs for kidney and vascular disease, has brought in another $15.2 million in equity- and options-based funding says an SEC filing  [Erin Kutz, xconomy.com, Aug 12, 11]

Proteon Therapeutics  (Waltham, MA (research in KC); $200K SBIR) has received an additional $12 million in venture capital. ... developing a blood vessel-dilating drug candidate [Kansas City Business Journal, May 28, 09]

Biopharmaceutical startup Proteon Therapeutics (Waltham, MA; $250K SBIR) has completed a $38 million Series B equity financing deal and has signed a deal with Novartis worth a potential half billion dollars  [Mass High Tech, Mar 5]

Proteon Therapeutics (Waltham, MA and KC, MO; 2 SBIRs)  reports it has been awarded a patent by the European Patent Office covering the use of a class of proteins known as elastase, for dilating arteries and veins in humans.

Biopharmaceutical company Proteon Therapeutics (Waltham, MA; two Phase 1SBIRs) has locked up $12M financing following last year's $19M. ... to advance its first product candidate, PRT-201, into human clinical studies in both hemodialysis vascular access and peripheral arterial disease [Mass High Tech, Sep 6, 07]

<="" a=""> Proteostasis Therapeutics

Proteostasis Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) has added to its three-year-old Series A funding, boosting it from a planned $5 million to taking $70.6 million of what is now a planned $81.8 million round ... developer of a drug discovery platform aimed at developing therapeutics based on small molecules for Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Alzheimer’s disease.  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Jun 2, 11]

David Pendergast, the former CEO who led Transkaryotic Therapies through its sale to Shire Pharmaceutical Group, has helped new startup Proteostasis Therapeutics (no SBIR) raise $45 M in its first round, the company said.  Proteostasis was founded on the research of Jeffrey Kelley of the Scripps Research Institute in California and Susan Lindquist of the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at MIT[Mass High Tech, Aug 25]

<="" a="">Proteotech

In Washington state’s biotech cluster, 83 local biotech companies were awarded grants worth a combined $34 million,   Adaptive TCR, AVI Biopharma, Omeros, Proteotech, and Trubion Pharmaceuticals and 78 others. [Luke Timmerman, Seattle Times, Nov 3] Most were $245K, a little money for almost everyone. Too little money to make a big swing in effect. Just politics.

<="" a="">Proteus Biomedical (Redwood City, CA)

It’s hard to find a better example of how technology is revolutionizing patient care than the tiny edible sensor Proteus Biomedical (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR) plans to begin selling this fall in the UK.  When the grain-of-sand-sized sensor is integrated into a drug tablet or capsule and activated by stomach fluid, it signals when the medicine was taken to a patch on the patient’s body. Then the patch relays the information along with the person’s heart rate and other medical details to a caregiver’s phone – all without a visit to the doctor.  [Steve Johnson, San Jose Mercury News, Mar 26, 12]

Proteus Biomedical  (Redwood, CA; no SBIR) a seven-year-old start-up, that is working on "smart pills" — internal sensors that monitor a person's health ... has lined up more than $60 million in funding and will concentrate for now on designing smart pills that monitor mechanical and electrical devices, as opposed to, say, blood chemistry.  [Josh Quittner, Time, Dec 15, 08]

A system that monitors pill taking and its effects is being engineered by a Silicon Valley startup. The technology consists of pills that report when they've been taken, and sensors that monitor the body's responses. The company behind the technology, Proteus Biomedical, (Redwood City, CA; no SBIR), calls its technology the Raisin system. George Savage, Proteus's cofounder and a former ER physician, says that the company was motivated by the fact that so many medical problems stem from drug compliance problems. According to Savage, 40 percent of hospital readmissions for heart failure happen because patients fail to take their medications properly. [Michael Chorost, MIT Tech Review, Mar 20]

 

 

<="" a=""> Protez Pharmaceuticals (Malvern, PA)

Novartis AG purchased Protez Pharmaceuticals (Malvern, PA; no SBIR) a.developer of antibiotics, this week for $400 M cash. [Pittsburgh Business Times, Jun 6]

 

<="" a="">ProThera Biologics (Providence, RI)

ProThera Biologics (East Providence, RI; $3M SBIR) received a $500,000 financing commitment from the Slater Technology Fund, according to Slater. Slater reports that the $500,000 commitment follows its initial $100,000 grant to ProThera in 2001. [Mass High Tech, Jun 25]

<="" a="">Proto Labs (Maple Plain,MN)

Medical devices start-ups powered Minnesota to the best quarterly VC performance in eight years just as a sagging economy curbed venture spending across the country. ... Seven medical device firms captured $130 million, led by CVRx (Brooklyn Park, MN; no SBIR) that makes a device that treats high blood pressure, raised $84 million on top of the $200 million investors have already poured into the company.  Cardiac Concepts  (no SBIR) first-round financing totaled a hefty $21 million. ... Other notable deals: Proto Labs (Maple Plain, MN; no SBIR) -based maker of injection molded products, attracted $67.2 million. Sage Electrochromics (Faribault, MN; $2M SBIR) raised $13.3 million, which makes glass that influences building temperatures, previously won $16 million in venture financing.  [[Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct 26, 08]

 

<="" a=""> Proton Energy Systems (Wallingford, CT)

New England energy stimulus money for small biz:  $2.2 million for an energy storage project at Beacon Power  .... $2.1M for Proton Energy (Wallingford, CT; $1.7M SBIR) and Penn State University aim to develop an advanced energy storage device that incorporates a regenerative fuel cell  ....  General Compression, (Newton , MA; no SBIR)  $750K for a novel compressed air energy storage process [Kyle Alspach, Mass High Tech, Jul 13, 10]

Fuel Your Senators.  Proton Energy Systems (Wallingford, CT; $1.3M SBIR), a renewable hydrogen technology developer, has received a $2.62 million Army contract fto develop a regenerative fuel cell system, company officials said.... The two US Senators helped secure funding for the project. ...  In August, Proton announced being bought from its parent company Distributed Energy Systems Corp. by F9 Investments LLC for $10.2 million. [Mass High Tech, Oct 16, 08]

Proton Energy Systems (Wallingford, CT)  got a $2.3 million contract for a hydrogen technology-oriented follow-on research project for the development of fuel cell technologies [Nov 06]

High Flying Hydrogen. MDA gave Proton Energy Systems (Wallingford CT) got a $1.25M SBIR Phase 3 for continued development of regenerative fuel cell technology for high altitude airships. Proton is a a subsidiary of Distributed Energy Systems.  [Mass High Tech, Oct 12]  Phase 3, which isn't SBIR money, lets the government hand out a contract to the Phase 2 winner without further competition. The company is also in the middle of a three-year, $3.8 M project with the Department of Energy to develop methods to reduce the cost of high-pressure hydrogen generation from proton exchange membrane electrolysis.

 

<="" a="">Protonex Technology  (Southborough, MA)

Protonex Technology said it has been selected by the defense contractor Lockheed Martin to develop power supply concepts that will enable its HULC robotic exoskeleton to support extended missions of 72 hours or more. [Boston Globe, Feb 11, 10]

Protonex Technology reports it has landed $1.5 million from the U.S. Army for supplying portable battery charger fuel cells. [Mass High Tech, Feb 4, 10]

Protonex Technology landed a [Army and stimulus] contract worth $1.85 million for the development and supply of advanced portable battery charger/auxiliary power units (APU) fuel cell systems. ... could increase to $6.4 million if three option phases are awarded.  [Mass High Tech, Jan 20, 10]

A small unmanned aerial vehicle powered by a Protonex fuel cell has set an unofficial endurance record after a flight of more than 23 hours, the company. said. [Boston Globe, Oct 15, 09]  The Navy sponsored the project.

Protonex Technology got a $2 million follow-on contract from the U.S. Army to make Protonex’ solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems more rugged and robust to meet the Army’s needs. [Mass High Tech, Sep 22, 09]

Protonex Technology (Southborough, MA; $1.8M SBIR) announced Thursday it received a $599,000 contract with the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory to develop fuel cell power systems for aerial drones.  [Mass High Tech, Sep 17, 09]

Protonex Technology (Southborough, MA; $2M SBIR) said its fuel-cell power system has been successfully tested in a Talon military robot from Foster-Miller. [Boston Globe, Apr 21]

Protonex Technology won a $400,000 contract from the Army's ARO for further development of the use of high-performance liquid fuels in its solid-oxide fuel cell power systems.  .... In April, Protonex received a $3.65 million contract from ARO to develop the next generation of the firm’s Pulse M250 military power system. [Mass High Tech, Sep 9, 08]

Protonex Technology landed its second military contract in two weeks, receiving a $3.65 million contract from the Army. [Mass High Tech, Apr 28]

Protonex Technology (Southborough, MA) got a $1.62 M contract with the NRL for advanced development of high power fuel cell systems for small UAVs.  ... makes fuel cells for commercial use. It began working with Cummins on applications in the trucking industry last September. ... shares debuted on the London Stock Exchange last July  [Mass High Tech, Apr 23, 08]

Protonex reports a new subcontract from Cummins to supply solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems for integration into a demonstration system for commercial mobile applications. [Mass High Tech, Sep 24, 07]

Protonex reports Raytheon has agreed to participate in the development of Protonex' portable fuel cell power system for the Army. ... Since going public last July on London's Alternative Investment Market (AIM), Protonex has doubled its head count from about 40 employees last year to 85 employees. [Mass High Tech, Sep 12]

Protonex was up 20%, back to the 90s after a drop and a day off from trading. [Jul 6, 07]

Protonex took an 18% swan dive despite announcing an $800K AF contract extension. [Jul 3, 07]

Protonex Technology (Southborough, MA; $1M SBIR) which makes high-performance proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells will pay $12M for Mesoscopic Devices (Broomfield, CO; $5M+ SBIR) which makes a range of fuel cells.

They Still Speak English. Ross Kerber [Boston Globe, Jan 28] notes that four Boston area companies have gone public recently by listing on the London AIM exchange. Of the four, fuel cell developer Protonex Technology had about $1M in SBIR, and fish farmer Aqua Bounty had just one Phase 1. 

<="" a="">Prototype Productions (Ashburn, VA)

Prototype Productions (Ashburn, VA; $1.4M SBIR)  built or invented 176 gadgets over the years, spanning the defense, aerospace and medical industries. They’ve made stuff for the Patriot missile, grenade launchers and Chinook helicopters. ...  hoping to [gross] $30 million to $50 million by mid-decade. ...  90 employees ... During our tour, Joe took me to a room and pointed at a box the size of two refrigerators. He called it a 3D laser printer. It’s too technical to get into, but he said the printer is the next advance in manufacturing. “Many say America is losing its industrial base, which is true to some extent,” he said. “But in the future, we won’t worry about this because we will no longer manufacture things. We will print things. Laser centering is the next trillion-dollar industry.”    [Thomas Heath, Washington Post, Apr 25, 11]

 

<="" a="">Provagen

Two spinoff companies from N.C. State University and N.C. A&T State University are the first to receive loans and legal help from a new set of programs designed by the N.C. Biotechnology Center in Research Triangle Park. The programs offer companies $50,000 in startup loans as well as free legal help from area law firms. ... NCSU's company, Sirga Advanced Biopharma, uses the technology of biochemistry professor Paul F. Agris to identify therapies for drug-resistant diseases ... A&T's spinoff company, Provagen, was formed to commercialize protein technology developed by John Allen, a molecular biologist.  [Raleigh News & Observer, Jun 22]

Provenance Biopharmaceuticals (Waltham, MA)


Provenance Biopharmaceuticals (Waltham, MA; no SBIR) has raised $8 million from brand new stealthy health care products acquisition company Allopexx Enterprises LLC to fund development of an anti-cancer therapy.   [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Dec 23, 11]

 

<="" a="">Proventys

A Durham medical research company co-founded by Ralph Snyderman, former CEO of the Duke University Health System, has attracted interest from several health-care heavy hitters and enough cash to introduce its first product this year. Proventys (no SBIR) is working on software that promises to help prevent complications from chemotherapy by identifying at-risk cancer patients. The company plans to use part of its $5.65 million in private financing to test the technology, and it might target other therapeutic areas.  [Raleigh News & Observer, May 15, 08]

<="" a="">pSivida (Watertown, MA)

pSivida (Watertown, MA; no SBIR) has taken a $15 million payment from Alimera Sciences (Alpharetta, GA; no SBIR) to cover licensing of its lead product Iluvien to treat diabetic macular edema (DME).  ... pSivida was launched in Australia, and reincorporated as a U.S. company based in Watertown in April of 2008.     [Mass High Tech, Apr 29, 10]

<="" a="">PTC Therapeutics

Genzyme will pay PTC Therapeutics (Plainfield, NJ; $5M SBIR)  $100 million, as well as milestone and royalty payments, to commercialize its drug, PTC124, outside the U.S. and Canada, where PTC will commercialize the drug. [Mass High Tech, Jul 17, 08]

 

<="" a="">Pulmatrix (Lexington, MA)

Pulmatrix  (Lexington, MA; no SBIR), a clinical stage biotechnology company , said that it has secured $14 million in new funding in a Series B1 round ... to accelerate the development of its drug candidate pipeline. The company is focused on discovering and developing a new class of therapies for the prevention, treatment, and control of respiratory diseases.  [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Aug 15, 11]

Pulmatrix (Lexington, MA; no SBIR) said it has been awarded a $5.7 million grant from DARPA. ...  focused on new treatments for respiratory diseases, and the DARPA grant is for developing potential treatments for respiratory infections caused by weaponized, engineered, or naturally occurring pathogens  [Boston Globe, Dec 14, 10]

Pulmatrix (Lexington, MA; no SBIR) is starting a Phase 1b/2a clinical trial of its new inhaled influenza treatment PUR003, which possibly could be used against the current swine flu. .... said that its lead drug candidate PUR003 is a so-called Cationic Airway Lining Modulator drug. ... founded in 2003 by scientists from Harvard University and MIT with an eye to creating inhaled drugs and supporting technologies to treat and control disease. ... Earlier this year, Pulmatrix secured $3.5 million [VC]  [Mass High Tech, May 4, 09]

Pulmatrix (Lexington, MA; no SBIR) has closed on more than $3 million in a recent funding round.  Pulmatrix’s mission is to prevent the spread of airborne and respiratory infectious diseases in animals and humans with a mixed hardware-chemical combination. It was founded in 2003 by scientists from Harvard University and MIT with an eye to creating inhaled drugs and supporting technologies to treat and control disease.  [Mass High Tech, Mar 13, 09]


<="" a="">Purfresh (Fremont, CA)

Purfresh (Fremont, CA; no SBIR) has raised $2 million of a $2.5 million traunche of funding.  The Fremont-based company makes technology used to clean and purify food and water. It's raised $26 million since March of 2010, according to financial disclosures, on top of a $25 million round the company announced in 2008.[San Francisco Business Times, Jul 8, 11]



<="" a="">Pursuit Vascular (Maple Grove, MN)

Pursuit Vascular (Maple Grove, MN; no SBIR) closed on about $1.3 million in capital, according to a regulatory filing. ....  trying to raise a total of $2 million. ...  developing a product that aims to reduce infection in hemodialysis patients, announced plans to kick off the round in April after closing on $750,000 in bridge financing. [Katherine Grayson, Minneapolis St Paul Business Journal, Aug 17, 12]

Pursuit Vascular
(Maple Grove, MN; no SBIR) raised $750,000 in bridge financing during the first quarter and will soon kick off another round of fundraising, the company announced. ...  has developed a catheter technology that it says could reduce the risk of infection in hemodialysis patients. In addition to the bridge financing, the company now wants to raise $2 million, which it will put toward prepping for clinical trials and intellectual-property costs.  [Katherine Grayson, Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, Apr 30, 12]


<="" a="">Qcue (Texas)

When startup FireFly LED Lighting (Austin, TX; no SBIR) was accepted into the Austin Technology Incubator two years ago, its LED bulbs were still prototypes.  Since then, the company has launched its product line, signed customers including Kerbey Lane Cafe and the University of Texas and received $3.4 million from backers including the Central Texas Angel Network and the Texas Emerging Technology Fund.....  Since its founding in 1989 by legendary business leader George Kozmetsky, ATI has worked with more than 200 startups, helping them raise nearly $1 billion in investment capital.  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American Statesman, Jan 26, 12]  Graduates: Agile Planet,  Atomometrics, Axelo, Calxeda, Dorsan Biofuels, Famigo, GameSalad, Ideal Power Converters, Itzbig, Nitero, Notice Technologies, Open Algae, Qcue, RFMicron, RRE Solar,  Savara Pharmaceuticals, Spredfast, Terapio ($500K  SBIR), Unwired Nation, WiMax.com. 

 

<="" a="">QD Vision (Watertown, MA)

QD Vision (Watertown, MA; $1.7M SBIR)  reports it has won a $900,000 development contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to make a pair of prototype devices based on its quantum dot infrared materials. ... In May QD Vision raised $22M to expand its quantum dot technology. [Rodney Brown, Mass HIgh Tech, Aug 17, 11]

QD Vision (Watertown, MA; $1.6M SBIR) has bought a patent portfolio related to using quantum dots – the QD in QD Vision – in display and lighting products from Motorola Inc., for an undisclosed amount.  ... plans to ship its first products, which include display backlight units used in cell phones, laptops and TVs, in 2011 [Mass High Tech, May 24, 10]

Barely one month after reporting a $10 million venture investment, QD Vision (Watertown, MA; $1.7M SBIR) says it has taken in $3 million from DTE Energy Ventures to help expand the market for its technology for LED lighting and displays products. [Mass High Tech, Jan 21, 10]

QD Vision (Watertown, MA; $900K SBIR) landed $10 million in its latest financing round ... developer of Quantum Light, which uses quantum dots to produce high output LEDs that draw less power than traditional products  [Mass High Tech, Dec 16, 09]

QD Vision (Watertown, MA; $900K SBIR) got an Army Phase 2 SBIR to continue the development of micro-displays based on the company’s quantum dot light emitting diode (QLED) technology. ... part of the firms VC backing comes from CIA's In-Q-Tel.  .... technology is based on the work of Vladimir Bulovic, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at MIT, and Moungi Bawendi, a professor of chemistry at MIT focused on the synthesis of nanomaterials [Mass High Tech, Jun 9, 09]

QD Vision (Watertown, MA, $900K SBIR) is promoting a new LED-based lamp that it made with Nexxus Lighting (Charlotte, NC; no SBIR). Nexxus makes a lamp designed to screw into standard sockets used in recessed ceiling lighting. It consists of an array of white-light LEDs encircled by fins that remove excess heat. QD Vision adds an optic--a plastic cover with a special coating that snaps into place over the LEDs. It's that coating that makes the difference in the quality of the light. It consists of quantum dots--tiny bits of semiconductor material just a few nanometers in diameter. When excited by a light source--in this case, the LEDs--quantum dots radiate light in a wavelength that varies according to the size of the dot. [Neil Savage, MIT Tech Review, May 13, 09]

Following its recently announced funding from In-Q-Tel, the CIA venture arm, Watertown-based QD Vision (Watertown, MA; one SBIR) has also landed $9 M of an expected $16 M round of Series C funding from private investors, according to [SEC] documents [Mass High Tech, Apr 11]

<="" a="">Qioptiq (Fairport, NY)


Qioptiq (Fairport, NY; no SBIR) landed a $1.1 million contract from the U.S. government to serve as the prime contractor for a head-up displays project, the company said  .... adding six jobs to its local workforce of 65 .... design and manufactures photonic products for industrial manufacturing, medical and life sciences, defense, aerospace and research and development applications.  [Andrea Deckert, Rochester Business Journal, Jun 6, 11]

<="" a="">QM Power (Boston, MA)

QM Power (Boston, MA; $700K SBIR) is looking for $5 million to $10 million in Series B funding to commercialize its technology ... “We’re moving now from a stage where we’ve finished research and development and prototyping and going into 2010 looking to start production,” [CEO] Piper said. Piper said there is a $1 trillion installed base of products that could be improved by QM Power technology, and he estimates a market potential of about $70 billion per year.  [Brendan Lynch, Mass High Tech, Jan 6, 10]

 

<="" a="">QR Pharma (Radnor, PA)

QR Pharma (Radnor, PA; no SBIR), a pharmaceutical company focused on developing treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, raised $2.4 million in a seed round of investments [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Jun 2, 10]

 

<="" a="">Qteros (Marlborough,MA)

Cellulosic ethanol company Qteros (Marlborough, MA; no SBIR) said it has raised $22 million in a Series C round and inked a partnership deal with a major Indian ethanol firm, which the company said gives it a clear path to commercialization within 18 to 24 months. [Kyle Alspach, Mass High Tech, Jan 5, 11]  Just as enthusiasm for US government subsidy is waning.

Qteros (Marlborough, MA; no SBIR)  and the University of Massachusetts Amherst have patented the fermentation method they use to make biofuel, a plant-based alternative to gasoline, using the so-called Q Microbe. [Erin Ailworth, Boston Globe, Mar 23, 10]

 

<="" a="">Quadraspec

Quadraspec (Purdue Research Park - West Lafayette, IN; no SBIR) received $2.5 million from venture capital firms led by Clarian Health Ventures of Indianapolis. ... makes a machine to diagnose diseases from a blood test. The technology can detect cancer, cardiovascular disease and other serious illnesses in their early, most treatable stages. [Indianapolis Star, SEp 13, 08]

<="" a="">Quadra-Aerrow International (Glastonbury, CT)

Six start-up technology firms have received grants as part of the state's small-business incubator program,  ... administered by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology ...  $32,000 to $50,000 went to: AllerQuest LLC of West Hartford, Catelectric Corp. of Storrs, Hydrogen Safety of East Hartford, Quadra-Aerrow International of Glastonbury, Revegen Inc. of Farmington and the Center for Network Centric Product Support Research of East Hartford.  [Hartford Courant, Dec 12, 08]  no SBIR for any

<="" a="">QualityMetric (Lincoln, RI)

QualityMetric (Lincoln, RI; $1.5M SBIR)  got a $2M NIH SBIR Phase 2 to develop tools to measure the health of people with asthma [Mass High Tech, Oct 16, 07]

QualityMetric (Lincoln, RI) got two NIH SBIRs totaling $1.1M to develop uses for its computerized adaptive testing technology.  ... QualityMetric executives say the company uses proprietary analytic methodologies to capture, benchmark, interpret and report on patient-based health information to use in the development of new treatments. [Mass High Tech, Nov 1,06]  QM has had several Phase 1s and one prior Phase 2.


<="" a="">Qualtech Systems (East Hartford, CT)

Qualtech Systems [East Hartford, CT; $12M SBIR]  "The first 10 years, if there were no SBIR program, there would be no Qualtech," Deb says. "If we only had product revenue, we wouldn't have a company." ...   half the company's annual revenues of more than $3.5 million come from commercial licensing and commercial services. NASA is the biggest government client, at 40 percent of revenues, with the Pentagon another 10 percent. ....  continued for nearly two decades, providing jobs for easily a dozen UConn engineering grads, attracting other young engineers from out of state, and retaining bright immigrants who come here to study, shows why these ideas have such appeal. [Mara Lee, Hartford Courant, Aug 10, 12]  A touchy-feely story of a company dependent on government contracts with technology that has a low capital barrier to entry. What was the government thinking for two decades of "investment"? Where is the wealth-creating downstream economics for a respectable ROI? After maybe a couple of million in the first three years, why could not the company compete in its industry without government propping-up? The problem is that SBIR has too much money for its own good as the agencies feel forced to incorporate it into their mainline R&D which is too conservative for seeding disruptive innovation.

<="" a="">Qualtré (Marlborough, MA)

Qualtré (Marlborough, MA; no SBIR) which makes solid-state silicon MEMS motion sensors, announced the closing of a $10 million round of financing to help launch products targeting both high-volume consumer and industrial applications....   Founded in 2008, the company took in $8 million in Series B financing in 2010, and $10 million last July  [Don Seiffert, Mass High Tech, May 30, 12]

Qualtré (Marlborough, MA; no SBIR) an inertial sensor company  has raised $10 million from venture capital backers ... after the company gave a successful demonstration of its silicon MEMS bulk-acoustic wave gyroscope, which Qualtré said it intends to commercialize, ... cheaper to make and more accurate than current sensors   [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tevh, Jul 8,11]

Qualtré (Marlborough,MA; no SBIR) an inertial sensor company, has taken in $8 million in a Series B financing round ... solid-state multi-axis MEMS gyroscopes are intended for use in game controllers, mobile handsets and digital camera imaging. [Mass High Tech, Apr 22, 10]

<="" a="">Quanterix (Cambridge, MA)

A molecule in a haystack. Quanterix (Cambridge, MA; one SBIR) won a [$250K] contract from the Department of Homeland Security to develop a test for the botulinum toxin that would be sensitive enough to find a single molecule in a sample. ... Founded in 2007, Quanterix has received $26 million in two rounds of financing  [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Dec 1, 11]

On the same day it announced a new partnership with Stratec Biomedical AG of Germany Quanterix (Cambridge, MA; one SBIR) filed a federal document showing it has closed on $6 million of a new open-ended financing. ... makes an array system for molecular diagnostic tests  ... will co-develop and manufacture a fully automated instrument for Quanterix’s Single Molecule Array (SiMoA) technology for both the life sciences and in vitro diagnostics (IVD) markets. [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Aug 22, 11] 

Drug discovery services company Quanterix (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) closed a $10 million second tranche of a Series A funding round, according to online reports.  Quanterix’s providers systems to analyze molecules and cells to find new drugs and make tests for diseases. It was spun off from Tufts University with technology developed by a chemistry professor-turned-entrepreneur, David Walt. [Mass High Tech, Aug 25]

<="" a="">Quantum Epitaxial Designs (Bethelehem, PA)

Quantum Going Public. The DOD SBIR isn't completely dead. One firm with only $1.7M of SBIR 1991-1996, including 5 Phase 1s from BMDO, will go public this week. Quantum (Bethlehem, PA), which has only $7M in sales, up 35% from last year from several industrial customers for its compound semiconductors, is priced to raise $20M for 40% of the company

 

<="" a="">Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide (Irvine CA)

Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide (Irvine, CA; one SBIR) down 10% after it filed to sell as much as $75 M of stock, preferred stock and warrants. [Wall Street Journal, Jul 8, 08]

A new contract helped Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies  (Irvine, CA; one SBIR)  gain 16% ... propulsion-systems company said its German solar partner Advanced & Automotive Solar Systems GmbH received a $17 million contract from Sunworx GmbH for silicon photovoltaic-solar modules. [Wall Street Journal, May 28, 08]

Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide (Irvine CA; one SBIR) intends to have its first car, a four-door plug-in hybrid vehicle, on the market in the U.S. by 2009  [Wall Street Journal, Oct 29]

 

 

<="" a="">Quantum Logic Devices

From the Texas Emerging Technology Fund, Image Trends (Austin, TX; no SBIR) which develops image correction and enhancement products for commercial and amateur photographers will receive $1 million, and RFMicron (Austin, TX; no SBIR) $250,000 to speed development of its microchip technology  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American-Statesman, Jul 14, 08]  Og ten central TX companies fed from the fund, only one has failed so far: Nanocoolers (no SBIR) Tried to create a thermoelectric cooling system that would help cool semiconductors. Closed in 2007. The others: Molecular Imprints Inc. Nanotechnology company that makes advanced equipment used in producing computer chips, disk  drives and other products. Monebo Technologies (no SBIR) Heart monitoring device called CardioBelt that enables users to obtain their own electrocardiogram while at home.  Quantum Logic Devices  ($1+M SBIR, moved from NC) Developing a system that uses single-electron devices to analyze  DNA, protein and other molecular interactions. Receptor Logic Ltd. (no SBIR) Developing antibodies to improve understanding of the immune system and lead to better drugs and vaccines. Xitronix(no SBIR) Developing advanced semiconductor testing technology. XTreme Power (no SBIR) Developing electrical storage systems that are used to cut energy bills for commercial and industrial plants.

<="" a="">QuantumSphere (Santa Ana, CA)

QuantumSphere (Santa Ana, CA; one Phase 1 SBIR)  is approaching nanotechnology on a broad scale by making an array of catalysts that allow batteries to operate for longer periods, electronic displays to be manufactured at lower costs and ammonia fertilizers to be produced using less energy while also generating less carbon dioxide. ...  got its start with $100,000 investment from two angel investors: Jon Faiz Kayyem, a trustee of California Institute of Technology, and Marc H. Goroff, who has a doctorate from Caltech and is the founder of several companies.  [James Flanigan, New York Times, Jul 16, 09]

 

<="" a=""> Quark Biotech (Fremont, CA)

Quark Biotech (Fremont, CA; one Phase 1 SBIR) filed for IPO.

 

<="" a=""> Quark Pharmaceuticals (Fremont, CA)

Quark Pharmaceuticals (Fremont, CA; no SBIR) raised $10 million in venture funding....  working on drugs for two eye disorders: wet age-related macular degeneration and diabetic macular edema. It’s also developing a treatment for use with kidney transplantation. [Stephen EF Brown, San Francisco Business Times, Jun 17,10]

 

<="" a="">Quidel (San Diego, CA)

A day after announcing a 4 million-share stock sale, medical-testing company Quidel (San Diego, CA; one SBIR) said Thursday it will price each share at $13.15. Existing shares of Quidel fell $1.20, or 8 percent, to $13.23. The offering could raise $52.6 million for the company, which plans to spend the funds on acquisitions, debt repayment and other purposes.  [Keith Darce, signonsandiego,com, Jan 6, 11]

diagnostic test maker Quidel (San Diego, CA; one SBIR) announced plans to buy the privately held Ohio diagnostics company Diagnostic Hybrids (Athens, OH; $500K SBIR) for about $130 million. [Thomas Kupper, San Diego Union Tribune, Jan 12, 10]

 

<="" a="">Quick–Med Technologies (Boca Raton, FL)

A team of UF professors and alumni, sponsored by Quick–Med Technologies (Boca Raton, FL; no SBIR), has created a new adhesive bandage that repels bacteria and promotes faster healing. The product, which received FDA approval last week, will be sold in stores come July and will aid in the creation of anti–bacterial military clothing and more effective hand gels. Known as the NIMBUS, the bandage is the first and only non–leeching, microbicidal barrier dressing. [alligator.com, Mar 5,09]

 

<="" a="">Quincy Bioscience (Madison, WI)

Quincy Bioscience (Madison, WI; no SBIR) that makes an anti-aging dietary supplement from jellyfish protein has raised $250,000 ...  The investment brings to $1.5 million the amount  has raised in a planned $3 million funding round ...  markets an anti-aging dietary supplement called Prevagen at Rite-Aid stores, more than 1,000 independent health food stores, and through its own website.  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug 26, 10]

Quincy Bioscience (Madison, WI; no SBIR, founded 2004) said it has received a patent on its use of a protein derived from jellyfish that it uses for products to fight the aging process.  The patent covers the use of aequorin-related compounds for preventing and alleviating symptoms and disorders related to calcium imbalance [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jul 8, 10]

<="" a=""> Quintessence Biosciences (Madison, WI)

Quintessence Biosciences (Madison, WI; $0.4M SBIR) will use ($0.9M SBIR) to support development of more drugs based on its Evade Ribonuclease technology, the company said.... has similar products in pre-clinical research, the company said.  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Sep 4, 09]

Rising Star.  When Laura Strong set out in 2000 to forge a licensing agreement and raise money for a young Madison biotech company, there were no programs or networks set up to help. Strong and her colleagues at Quintessence Biosciences (no SBIR) managed to get the license and raise angel capital, ... accomplishments earned Strong one of five Rising Star awards at the Wisconsin Biotechnology and Medical Device Association.... Speakers came from state companies such as Cellectar (no SBIR), Platypus Technologies ($6M SBIR), Third Wave Technologies ($6M SBIR), and TomoTherapy ($1M SBIR) [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Oct 19]  The other companies prove that there was indeed help available for Quintessence, SBIR and the state had an active program in helping companies pursue federal funding. HHS, the natural source of SBIR for bio work, seems to have a good track record of helping young companies with markets in their eyes.

<="" a="">Quorum Systems (San Diego, CA)

What China can do is trade its dollars for US business capacity: Quorum Systems (San Diego, CA; no SBIR), maker of radio-frequency chips for mobile phones, has agreed to be acquired by China-based Spreadtrum Communications for $70M in cash and stock. [Mike Freeman, San Diego Union Tribune, Nov 20] Just as worried about Japan Inc in the 1980s, we can worry about China Inc now. The long term solution is to restore America's financial strength, which unfortunately requires biting too many bullets for the politicians to ask for. No, we have to tell our politicians that we want sensible management, not pandering to our illusions.

<="" a=""> QPixel

Qpixel Technology, a Cupertino chip company, is the latest to benefit from excitement surrounding video sharing. It specializes in low-power digital video and audio compression, and has just raised $25 M in its second round of funding. ... One True Media is a new Silicon Valley start-up (Redwood City) that is offering video creation tools, and wants to be the next video-sharing company. There are dozens of competitors, so this is a long shot. [siliconbeat.com, Jun 16]

 

<="" a="">Radant Technologies

Radant Technologies (Stow, MA; $1.5M SBIR)  landed a $14 M deal from the U.S. Navy for submarine communication antenna radomes and related engineering services  [Mass High Tech, Jan 21]

 

<="" a="">Radiabeam Technologies (Santa Monica, CA)

The rest of DOE,'s Phase II list also shows a preference for SBIR experience: Euclid Labs (Solon, OH; $18M SBIR since 2004, all DOE including one $10M award), four new Phase IIs;  Radiabeam Technologies (Santa Monica, CA, $10M SBIR since 2005  SBIR) three awards; Tech-x (Boulder, CO; something over $50M SBIR since 1994) three new awards Muons (Batavia, IL;  $13M since 2002 SBIR, all DOE) three awards; Far-Tech (San Diego, CA;$9+M SBIR since 2003) two awards; Ridgetop Group (Tucson, AZ; $10M SBIR since 2002) two awards;  Calabazas Creek Research (San Mateo, CA; $26M since 1994) two awards; Niowave (Lansing, MI;  $5M since 2007 SBIR) two awards;  Mesa Photonics  (Santa Fe, NM;  $0.8M since 2008 SBIR) two awards; Green Mountain Radio Research ( Colchester, VT;  $5.7M SBIR)  two awards.  Of 104 awards, 33 went to multiple winners who already had collected $378M SBIR from the federal government.  Is DOE over-emphasizing contractor competence at the expense of companies and technologies with brighter futures?  No one knows becasue Congress shows little interest in the question, and the agency has a bias toward making itself smarter.  

<="" a=""> Radiant Photonics (Austin, TX)

Radiant Going for Broke (Nov 14) Radiant Photonics (Austin, TX) is going into bankruptcy when its second round of financing fell into the hole created by the WTC collapse. Or at least something spooked the four investors who were discussing a term sheet CEO Markwardt says that major changes to its business strategies in the works, and they are discussing its options with about seven companies and investment groups. [Austin Business Journal, Nov 12, and Fred Patterson for reporting it] Radiant was/is the spin-off of Radiant Research, a creation of Ray Chen and a winner of a fistful of BMDO Phase 2 SBIRs, all premised on the market potential. Indeed, the first round of finance proved that BMDO had done the right thing in seeding the technology at Radiant. Alas, the collapse of a second round coupled with the collapse of BMDO's market philosophy means a dark day for photonics entrepreneurs.

Radiant Gets $18M. (Sep 26) Radiant Photonics (Austin, TX) got its first round of investment, $18M to expand its production capabilities for Optical Networking. The tranche was led by Adam Smith Investment Partners and KLM Capital with Intel Capital and Ridgewood Capital. Radiant is a venture of Ray Chen's Radiant Research, a semi-academic firm that Ray started and nourished with BMDO SBIR. BMDO no doubt forced the investment issue by continuously raising the co-investment requirement for further SBIR money, which is what SBIR should be doing. BMDO would say, &quot;either convert your past promises to real investment or stop predicting any future investment. Ray started SBIR life as the main PI at Physical Optics, a huge SBIR user. Optics is as hot as an investment topic can get, with Forbes ASAP devoting its whole August issue to it. The predictions of riches abound. With the right kind of luck, Radiant could fall into the enriching clutches of the fiber backbone competitors Lucent and Nortel as CoreTek did for $1.4B.

 

<="" a="">Radiation Monitoring Devices (Watertown, MA)

Aerodyne Research (Billerica, MA; 199 SBIR Phase Is and something like $80M total SBIR) will receive five $1-million DOEnergy [SBIR Phase II] grants, and Radiation Monitoring Devices (Watertown, MA;  404 SBIR Phase Is and something like $150M SBIR) will receive three $1 million grants, the department said. ...  Other local companies in line to receive Energy Department grants: Conispire (Boston, MA: no SBIR) , Aspen Products Group (Marlborough.MA; $5.6M SBIR), Capesym (Natick, MA; $5.3M SBIR); Nova Scientific  (Sturbridge, MA; $9M SBIR); Beacon Power (Tyngsborough, MA; $1M SBIR), the department said.  [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Jun 29, 12] 

Radiation Monitoring Devices (Watertown, MA; $90M SBIR; and RMD Instruments, both photonics-related instruments companies have been acquired for $20 M by Dynasil, a photonics manufacturer for instruments, optical materials, coatings and components.  [Mass High Tech, Jul 3, 08]  Another SBIR mill bought for a small fraction of the SBIR "investment", and this is one company that was at least worth something after all those SBIRs. All the political bleating about how crucial small companies are to America is only half true; they are important but SBIR does nothing except shift government R&D for small companies from one list of winners to a different list of winners doing the same thing. And there is still no compelling evidence that SBIR has had any economic impact that wouldn't have happened anyway.

Loving Experience.   Scientific Systems (Woburn,MA; $50M+ SBIR) won a NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIR for Distributed Formation State Estimation Algorithms Under Resource and Multi-Tasking Constraints. Creare (Hanover NH; $120M SBIR) won four NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIRs. Intelligent Automation (Rockville MD; $100M SBIR) won three NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIRs. Physical Optics (Torrance, CA; $200M SBIR) won one NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIR. Radiation Monitoring Devices (Watertown, MA; $90M SBIR) won one NASA JPL Phase 2 SBIR. Etc, etc, etc. A zillion start-ups all over America got letters saying there was not enough money to nurture their ideas.

<="" a="">RadioMedix (Houston, TX)

RadioMedix (Houston, TX; no SBIR) won $2.8 million  from the Texas Emerging Technology Fund. [Austin American Statesman, Feb 10, 11]

<="" a="">Radius Health (Cambridge, MA)

Radius Health (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) biotech that has raised at least $198 million in financing, filed to go public in an offering that could raise up to $86.2 million.....  developing new treatments for osteoporosis and other women’s health conditions. The company is not generating revenue and had a $42.4 million net loss in 2011, according to the company’s IPO-intentions filing with the SEC.  [Kyle Alspach, Boston Business Journal, Feb 7, 12]

Radius Health (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR)  biotech focused on osteoporosis and women’s health, has brought in $27.65 million in closing the second tranche of a $91 million funding round announced in May. ...   to support its osteoporosis therapeutics program through a Phase 3 clinical trial of its bone-building injection drug, BA058, which it plans to market in the U.S. and Europe.  [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Nov 23, 11]


<="" a="">Rainbow Organic Farms

USDA has a less showy newsletter the latest issue of which notes that Diana Endicott, of Rainbow Organic Farms Co. has been a recipient of the National Agriculture Hall of Fame’s Honor Acre, the SBIR Tibbetts Award and multiple USDA SBIR awards for her work in developing new and innovative ways to bring together the resources, commitments and support for small farmers to produce and sell their products to the retail market. Which sounds like USDA SBIR funds ag marketing.

 

<="" a="">RainDance Technologies

RainDance Technologies (Lexington, MA; $1.2M SBIR), a provider of microdroplet-based tools for single molecule and single cell analysis, announced that it has closed a $37.5 million Series D financing round. ... for new applications for its commercial targeted sequencing and sequence enrichment solution in the medical genetics and research markets, .. founded in 2004 by scientists from Harvard University, The Medical Research Centre in Cambridge, England, and the ESPCI in Paris [Lynette Cornell, Mass High Tech, Jan 25, 11]

drug discovery toolmaker Raindance Technologies (Lexington, MA; $400K SBIR) has raised $6 million of a proposed $12 million round, according to official documents. ... makes and sells microdroplet-based devices and related tools to accelerate human health and disease research.  [Mass High Tech, May 8, 09]

RainDance Technologies (Lexington, MA; one SBIR), provider of droplet-based tools for life sciences research, reports it has formed a wholly owned subsidiary in France.  [Mass High Tech, Jul 10]

RainDance Technologies (Guilford, CT; $300K SBIR) will move to Lexington. The company said its new 28,000-square-foot facility in Lexington is double the size of its current location and will employ 65 people by the end of the year. The four-year-old firm's "microdroplet" technology is used to help sequence the human genome at greater speeds. [Todd Wallack, Boston Globe, May 20]

<="" a="">RainStorm (Orono, ME)

Maine Technology Institute today announced four new Development Awards — conditional loans — totaling $761,348 for four Maine technology companies. The awards by MTI, a publicly financed non-profit, were matched with combined contributions over $890,047 by the recipients: Wizbe Innovations (Manchester, ME)  $64,000 to develop parachute fabric for the U.S. Army with controllable and adjustable permeability. Wizbe initially began their work with a U.S. Army SBIR to develop a prototype fabric. ...  Pika Energy (Gorham, ME; no SBIR)   $274,291 to develop a wind turbine system that offers lower upfront costs to make it easier and less expensive for families and businesses to produce clean renewable electricity. Early stage development was supported with an MTI Seed Grant.   ...  Cerealus Holdings(Waterville, ME; no SBIR) $261,849 to commercialize their Cerecarb, which is designed to enable paper mills to reduce costs by substituting ash filler for expensive pulp fiber. ... RainStorm(Orono, ME; no SBIR) $161,208 to expand access to affordable education opportunities nationally by providing local adult education programs with a simple, affordable course catalog and online registration website.   [Mass High Tech, Jun 27, 11

 

<="" a="">Rain Water Solutions (Raliegh, NC)

Thirteen NC companies will split $1 M from a new state fund intended to help businesses create environmentally friendly technologies. In the Triangle area: Ecocurrent of Raleigh received $100,000 to convert hog manure into electric power; Kyma Technologies of Raleigh received $60,000 to work with N.C. State University on a more efficient, cheaper electric switch.; 3F LLC of Raleigh received $100,000 to develop a natural fiber-reinforced concrete formula.; Piedmont Biofuels of Pittsboro received $75,000 to work on a reactor that more efficiently creates biodiesel.; Nextreme Thermal Solutions of Durham received $57,319 to manufacture a generator that converts waste heat into electricity.; Rain Water Solutions of Raleigh received $18,000 to develop a new rain barrel manufacturing process. [Raleigh News & Observer, Jul 1]

<="" a="">RaNA Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA)

RaNA Therapeutics (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR). said it has completed a $20.7 million round of financing co-led by Atlas Venture, SR One, and Monsanto, with participation of Partners Innovation Fund.  ... is developing a technology platform to enable selective activation of target genes. [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Jan 18, 12]

Stealthy startup RaNA Therapeutics  (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) raised $2.66 million of a planned $20.66 million initial funding, according to federal documents. [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Dec 1, 11]

<="" a="">Range Fuels (Broomfield, CO)

Range Fuels (Broomfield, CO; no SBIR), a cellulosic ethanol company backed by as much as $156 million in U.S. loans and grants from[Bush] administration, is being forced by the government to liquidate its only factory [in Soperton, GA] after failing to produce the fuel. [Mario Parker, Bloomberg News, Dec 3, 11]

The Range Fuels (Broomfield, CO) plant, to be located in southeast Georgia, could be producing ethanol as soon as next year. It's being funded [$76M to the company for the construction] by the DOE as part of the agency's effort to increase the use of biofuels. [Kevin Bullis, MIT Tech Review, Nov 15] Those logs streaming down I-16 to the Savannah port can be diverted to making cellulosic fuel that is eons away from market economics until a new killer chemistry appears. From an economy standpoint, investing in chemistry is a lot cheaper than production plants for known uneconomical chemistry. But then, they wouldn't be pouring millions of pork into Georgia.

<="" a="">Ra Pharmaceuticals (Boston, MA)

Ra Pharmaceuticals (Boston, MA; no SBIR) has pulled in $10.3 million of a planned $27.6 million equity round of financing, according to [SEC] filing. [Mass High Tech, Feb 26, 10]

<="" a="">Rapid Diagnostek (Hudson, WI)

Rapid Diagnostek (Hudson, WI; no SBIR) has raised $4 million of venture capital ... to develop a portable, one-step sensing device that could quickly diagnose diseases, bacteria, viruses, and spores by analyzing blood, urine and saliva. The company moved to Hudson in 2008 from Minnesota. [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jan 26, 10]

Aldevon (Fargo, ND; no SBIR), maker of DNA and protein products is putting a research and sales operation in [Wisconsin] ....  founded by two ND State U graduates, has more than 70 employees, and provides products and services to pharmaceutical companies and diagnostic test-makers.  ... also welcomed to Wisconsin: RJA Dispersions (no SBIR), VitalMedix (no SBIR) and Rapid Diagnostek (no SBIR), from Minnesota; Flex Biomedical (one SBIR) and Exact Sciences (no SBIR), from Massachusetts; NanoMedex ($1M SBIR), from Florida; and Inviragen ($2M SBIR) from Colorado. Biotechnology is the fastest-growing segment of the Wisconsin economy, with an annualized growth rate of nearly 7%, [Gov] Doyle said in a statement. The sector has 400 companies in the state with 34,000 employees.

Six start-ups will be recognized for making strides to commercialization at a biotech industry summit in October. ... part of a one-day Biotechnology Vision Summit 2009 that is being run by BioForward, an organization that represents Wisconsin's biotech industry. AquaMost LLC (Madison, WI; one SBIR) , Echometrix  (Madison, WI; no SBIR), Flex Biomedical Inc(Madison, WI; one SBIR), Semba Biosciences (Madison, WI; no SBIR),  Invivosciences LLC (Wauwatosa, WI; no SBIR), and Rapid Diagnostek Inc  (Hudson, WI; no SBIR).  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Sep 22, 09]

Moving for Subsidy.  Lured by the state's tax credits for investments in high-growth companies, a  biotech start-up said it was moving to Wisconsin. VitalMedix (Minneapolis, MN; no SBIR) is developing a drug that first responders, trauma center surgeons and military medics could use. The drug, Tamiasyn, has the potential to allow humans to endure severe blood loss and inhibit organ damage during resuscitation. ....  Minnesota legislators tried to create a similar program but failed. ....  The credits had lured another biotech company. Rapid Diagnostek (no SBIR) moved to Hudson last year from St. Paul to take advantage of the credits. The top executive at BioE (no apparent SBIR) a Twin Cities tech company, praised Wisconsin's embrace of tech companies and didn't rule out a move.  [Kathleen Gallagher, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Jul 10, 09)

 

<="" a="">Rapid Micro Biosystems (Bedford, MA)

Rapid Micro Biosystems (Bedford, MA; no SBIR) has signed a deal with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) that could net up to $6.7 million for the microbial contamination detection firm. The contract calls for the development of rapid sterility testing for vaccines. ...  raised an $18.6 million Series A round of financing in July 2009  [Mass High Tech, Sep 22, 10]

Rapid Micro Biosystems (Bedford, MA; no SBIR) microbial contamination detection firm, has landed an investment of $18.6 million in a Series A round  [Mass High Tech, Jul 8, 09]

 

<="" a="">Rapiscan (Torrance, CA)

Demand for Rapiscan (Torrance, CA; one SBIR in 1993) products, which include airport metal detectors and larger machines used to scan cargo containers and trucks, is growing as governments all over the world increase their security efforts.  Rapiscan's cargo scanning business has doubled annually for the past three years, said Peter Kant, the company's vice president of global government affairs. And the company has signed more contracts with government agencies. ... offices in Singapore, Malaysia and Australia.  At the 30,600-square-foot Apex , NC facility, Rapiscan will build larger machines capable of checking for dangerous materials in cargo containers, trucks and other vehicles. ...  2007 revenue was $186.6 million, SEC filings from its parent company, OSI Systems, show. [Raleigh News&Observer, Mar 22]

 

<="" a="">Raser Technologies (Provo, UT)

Within six months of discovering an enormous geothermal field, a small Utah company had erected and fired up a power plant — an example of the speed with which companies are capitalizing on state mandates for alternative energy. Anticipation of new energy policies has sparked a rush on land leases as companies such as Raser Technologies (Provo, UT; no SBIR) lock up property that hold geothermal fields and potentially huge profits. [Paul Foy, AP, Dec 26] 

<="" a=""> Raydiance

THE DISRUPTION: Lasers that cut without heating surrounding material. THE DISRUPTED: The entire laser industry - medicine, aerospace and beyond. [Barry Schuler, former CEO of AOL] two-year-old startup, Raydiance, is taking aim at the $3 billion medical laser market with a technology called USP, or ultrashort pulse.  Why? Because USP lasers are phenomenally accurate.... USP devices have been in the hands of researchers since 1989, but they've also been unmanageably large and notoriously difficult to operate. Schuler's company, funded to the tune of $35 M, has already shrunk its device to the size of a microwave oven. [Business 2.0]  Why would medical laser capital flow so readily to an AOL founder? Because capital seeks entrepreneurs who know how to use it. Sweetness of the technology is a second consideration after a real entrepreneur puts up some of his money. The SBIR [theoretical] idea that capital- inspired commercialization will follow from government buying what government likes contradicts the real world of investing. If SBIR wants substantial economic spinoff, it has to look for entrepreneurs with new ideas, not just smart technicians. Oh sure, if you spend enough money on technicians, something will come out, but not enough to justify the government spending.

<="" a="">Receptor Logic

From the Texas Emerging Technology Fund, Image Trends (Austin, TX; no SBIR) which develops image correction and enhancement products for commercial and amateur photographers will receive $1 million, and RFMicron (Austin, TX; no SBIR) $250,000 to speed development of its microchip technology  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American-Statesman, Jul 14, 08]  Og ten central TX companies fed from the fund, only one has failed so far: Nanocoolers (no SBIR) Tried to create a thermoelectric cooling system that would help cool semiconductors. Closed in 2007. The others: Molecular Imprints Inc. Nanotechnology company that makes advanced equipment used in producing computer chips, disk  drives and other products. Monebo Technologies (no SBIR) Heart monitoring device called CardioBelt that enables users to obtain their own electrocardiogram while at home.  Quantum Logic Devices  ($1+M SBIR, moved from NC) Developing a system that uses single-electron devices to analyze  DNA, protein and other molecular interactions. Receptor Logic Ltd. (no SBIR) Developing antibodies to improve understanding of the immune system and lead to better drugs and vaccines. Xitronix(no SBIR) Developing advanced semiconductor testing technology. XTreme Power (no SBIR) Developing electrical storage systems that are used to cut energy bills for commercial and industrial plants.

Two Austin companies will share $3.7 million in grants from the Texas Emerging Technology Fund, which was created to spur commercialization of research in Texas. Receptor Logic Ltd. will receive $2 million to advance its work in the development of anti-bodies that can improve the understanding of the immune system and thus lead to better drugs and vaccines.  Terapio Inc. will receive $1.7 million to develop a cream to treat hand-foot syndrome, a painful swelling and numbness of the hands and feet that can occur as a side effect of several chemotherapy drugs.  Receptor was started in 2004 by Emergent Technologies Inc., an Austin-based life sciences venture capital firm, and Jon Weidanz, director of the Texas Tech University Center for Immunotherapeutic Research. The company, which has headquarters in Austin and a laboratory in Abilene, will use the investment to expand its commercialization efforts  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American-Statesman, Jun 19] Neither had SBIR.

<="" a="">Receptos (San Diego, CA)

Receptos  (San Diego, CA; no SBIR), which is using the structure of cellular G protein-coupled receptors to develop drug candidates for autoimmune therapies, has secured $10.8 million in a funding round that could be as much as $50 million, according to a recent regulatory filing. The biopharmaceutical startup raised about $25 million in a Series A round in 2009  [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Feb 23, 12]

Receptos (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) said that it will collaborate with pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly to develop therapies that act on certain protein receptors involved in cellular response. The companies will work on discovering orally administered drug candidates and move them through preclinical testing, Receptos said. The effort will focus on G protein-coupled receptors, a major class of targets for new drugs.  [Keith Darce, signonsandiego,com, Jan 6, 11]

<="" a="">Recodagen

things are looking better: the research-oriented startups seem poised to survive the downturn, and long-awaited clinical results could propel larger companies like Dendreon to stardom. ...  despite the financial crisis, the Accelerator, a local incubator based in Seattle's Eastlake neighborhood, created three firms last year - Recodagen, GPC-Rx and Mirina (none had SBIR) ... "Seattle is really a town of development-stage biotechs," Miller said. ... Light Sciences Oncology (no SBIR), a firm that canceled its initial public offering last February, managed to raise $10 million from venture capitalists in July. Private investors provided Redmond-based Healionics (no SBIR) — which manufactures material for implants — with a $2.6 million boost in December.  In a deal that could yield big results, Bothell-based Acucela (no SBIR), which is developing therapies to treat blindness, signed a partnership deal in September with Japanese firm Otsuka Pharmaceutical that could potentially bring it $258 million.   [Angel Gonzalez, Seattle Times, Jan 25]

Local biotech incubator Accelerator is hatching its seventh firm — Recodagen (no SBIR), which will research therapies to arrest the spread of cancerous tumors. The technology underpinning Recodagen was licensed out of the laboratory of J. Suzanne Lindsey at Washington State University in Pullman. ...  Accelerator's first technology-licensing deal with Washington State University, which in the past three years has been ramping up its efforts to get its research into the marketplace. [Angel Gonzalez, Seattle Times, Mar 14]

<="" a="">Recombinetics (Minneapolis,MN)

Recombinetics  (Minneapolis, MN; one STTR) that genetically engineers animals for biomedical and agricultural purposes, announced it has entered into a three-year development and license agreement with a Paris-based firm.Cellectis bioresearch will provide engineered nucleases to Recombinetics under the agreement. Recombinetics will use the nucleases to create animals with “improved genetic features,” according to a press release. Cellectis could receive up to $50 million if certain sales-based milestones are met and will receive royalties on products made through the agreement.  [Wendy Lee, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug 26, 11]

Recombinetics (Minneapolis, MN; no SBIR), which genetically engineers animals for biomedical and agricultural purposes, said it is continuing to have discussions with Elk Run officials on having a presence at the development in Pine Island. The company said it would use the loan to pay for patent and engineering-related expenses.  CEO Scott Fahrenkrug said he is continuing discussions with Elk Run’s developer on potentially building a bio-secure pig facility that may house up to 200 pigs with type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease. Fahrenkrug said he has also been talking with the Mayo Clinic on the possibility of him using a Rochester bio-secure facility for the pigs. [Wendy Lee, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Apr 24, 11]

<="" a="">ReconRobotics  (Edina, MN)

ReconRobotics (Edina, MN; no SBIR) received another multi-million contract with the Army for its micro-robot technology.  ...  $13.9 million to produce and deliver up to 1,000 miniature, throwable mobile robots.  [Evelina Smirnitskaya, Minneapolis / St Paul Business JounrL, Jun 28, 12]

ReconRobotics (Edina, MN) specializing in microrobot technology, said its opening international headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland. [Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, May 30, 12]

ReconRobotics (Edina, MN; no SBIR) said it has acquired Xollai, (St. Paul, MN; no SBIR) that develops systems to help military drones land. ReconRobotics makes throwable microrobots for the military, ...  a spokesman for ReconRobotics, said Xollai's St. Paul office will remain open and all nine of its employees will stay with the company. ReconRobotics now has 54 employees, Klobucar said. [Ed Stych, Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, Apr 4, 12]

ReconRobotics (Edina, MN; no SBIR). has sold more of its throwable robot kits to the U.S. military — this time to the Marine Corps.  [Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, Mar 13, 12]

ReconRobotics (Edina, MN; no SBIR) recently raised $1.4 million from investors  ... developing scout robots used by the U.S. military and FBI, is looking for another $2.5 million.  [Thomas Lee's Patent_pending blog, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Sep 14, 09]

ReconRobotics (Edina, MN; no SBIR), which makes mini remote-control robots for military and police reconnaissance work, has raised $1.5 million in add-on financing from current investors. ... complete the company’s most recent $4 million round of equity financing.  [Sam Black, Minneapolis/St Paul Business Journal, Sep 11, 09]

 

<="" a="">Regado Biosciences (Durham, NC)

Regado Biosciences  (Basking Ridge, NJ; one SBIR), a drug-development company whose technology was invented at Duke University, recently raised new funding that will see it through the bulk of next year. ...  The company, which is developing several blood thinners, isn't saying how much money it raised. CEO David Mazzo said that the new funding is an extension of the $40 million round of financing it completed in December 2009. ... The company's leading experimental drug, REG1, is an anti-coagulant aimed for use during angioplasty and stent implants.  [David Ranii, Raleigh News & Observer, Jul 2, 11]

Regado Biosciences (Durham, NC; one SBIR) raised $23M from VCs to continue testing a drug that promises to make heart surgery safer. [Raleigh News & Observer, Mar 27]

 

<="" a="">ReGen Biologics (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

The FDA announced its intention to rescind a 510(k) medical device registration held by ReGen Biologics (Hackensack, NJ; $400K SBIR) for the company’s Menaflex collagen scaffold. The FDA granted marketing approval for the product in 2008. However, on Oct. 14, 2010, the FDA notified the company that it intended to rescind prior clearance, stating, “The FDA has now concluded that the Menaflex device is intended to be used for different purposes and is technologically dissimilar from devices already on the market” and that “these differences can affect the safety and effectiveness of the Menaflex device. For example, instead of simply repairing or reinforcing damaged tissue like predicate devices, Menaflex is intended to stimulate the growth of new tissue to replace tissue that was surgically removed. Because of these differences, the Menaflex device should not have been cleared by the agency.” [JM Garvey, Mass High Tech, Jan 18, 11]

[FDA] panel of outside experts found that there isn’t enough scientific evidence to come to a firm conclusion about the benefits of a knee device approved by the FDA in 2008. ...  cited inadequate and low-quality evidence about the effectiveness of the Menaflex implant made by ReGen Biologics (Franklin Lakes, NJ; four Phase 1 SBIRs in mid 1990s), and not enough information about the device’s safety.  [Alicia Mundy, Wall Street Journal, Mar 24, 10]

The FDA said that four New Jersey congressmen and its own former commissioner unduly influenced the process that led to its decision last year to approve a patch for injured knees, an approval it is now revisiting.  ..  The agency’s scientific reviewers repeatedly and unanimously over many years decided that the device, known as Menaflex and manufactured by ReGen Biologics (Franklin Lakes, NJ; $400K SBIR a decade ago), was unsafe because the device often failed, forcing patients to get another operation. But after receiving what an F.D.A. report described as “extreme,” “unusual” and persistent pressure from four Democrats from New Jersey ... agency managers overruled the scientists and approved the device for sale in December.  [Gardiner Harris and David Halbfinger, New York Times, Sep 25, 09]

The recent approval of a new device to treat knee injuries followed a lobbying campaign that overcame repeated rejections by scientists within the FDA, agency documents show. The FDA's internal dissent over Menaflex, which targets the most-common knee injury afflicting everyone from high-school athletes to baby boomers, is straining a government agency that oversees a quarter of the U.S. economy. Some senior FDA staff members complained in documents that the handling of Menaflex, made by ReGen Biologics (Franklin Lakes, NJ; $400K SBIR)., shows how political and industry pressure can influence scientific conclusions. [Alicia Mundy,   [Wall Street Journal, Mar 6]


<="" a="">Regenerative Sciences (Broomfield, CO)

A U.S. federal court has found that a stem cell therapy offered by a Colorado clinic is a regulated drug. The ruling could spur a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) crackdown on other clinics offering untested adult stem cell treatments. Regenerative Sciences (Broomfield, CO; no SBIR) uses stem cells extracted from a patient’s own bone marrow to treat bone and joint injuries. The company calls its treatment a medical procedure. But in a 2010 suit, FDA argued that because the stem cells are more
than “minimally manipulated” and the procedure uses reagents that cross state lines, the cells are an FDA-regulated biological drug. 
[Science, Aug 3]

 

<="" a="">Regulus Therapeutics

Regulus Therapeutics (San Diego, CA; no SBIR, fiounded 2007) has filed [for IPO] ...   focuses on microRNA, a biotechnology specialty area. RNA, or ribonucleic acid, was only discovered about a dozen years ago. It’s considered important because RNA can influence an entire network of genes. With diseases, RNA doesn’t act normally. So by targeting RNA strands, biotech researchers may be onto a new way to treat certain ailments.Regulus is currently working on therapies for several diseases including kidney fibrosis, hepatitis C, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Long-time San Diego biotech entrepreneur Kleanthis Xanthopoulos is the company’s chief executive and president  ... has formed some heavyweight strategic alliances with pharmaceutical giants AstraZeneca, Sanofi and GlaxoSmithKline, who have provided a combined $56.6 million in upfront research funding.  Regulus, which spun out of Isis Pharmaceuticals and Alnylam Pharmaceuticals, also has raised an additional $50 million from founders and other investors.   .[Mike Freeman, utsandiego.com, Aug 22, 12]

Regulus Therapeutics (Carlsbad, CA; no SBIR) landed an investment of at least $35 million for drug discovery and development from French pharmaceutical giant Sanofi-Aventis, with the initial work targeting fibrosis.  The development alliance has a potential value of $750 million if certain milestones are met, making it the largest partnership in Regulus’ biotechnology specialty, known as microRNA. .... 45 employees, was founded by Isis Pharmaceuticals and Alnylam Pharmaceuticals. The companies each put about $20 million into Regulus, then stocked its staff and board with some of the leading experts in the microRNA field, Simeonidis said.  [Mike Freeman, signonsandiego.com, Jun 23, 10]

Alnylam Pharmaceuticals said it was one of two firms that invested a collective total of $20 million in Regulus Therapeutics (no SBIR) ... In 2007, Alnylam and Isis Pharmaceuticals established Regulus to "focus on the discovery, development, and commercialization of microRNA-based therapeutics," the two companies said in a press release.  [Boston Globe, Mar 5, 09].


RemoteReality (Westborough, MA)

A company that designs surveillance cameras for the military has moved from the suburbs of Boston to Putnam, winning $1 million in venture funding from Connecticut Innovations, the state's quasi-public authority that invests in technology firms. RemoteReality (Westborough, MA; $2.7M SBIR) also received venture capital from a private VC firm, Kuwait Holdings and an individual investor.  RemoteReality, which has received more than $10 million from the Pentagon to advance its technology, is looking to hire engineers.  [Mara Lee, Hartford Courant, Dec 22, 11]


Rempex Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA)

In its second round of venture funding, Rempex Pharmaceuticals (San Diego, CA; no SBIR)  raised $67.5 million. ...  has raised a total of $76 million since it was started this summer, seeks treatments aimed at antibiotic resistant bacteria.  [SEF Brown, San Francisco Business Times, Nov 9, 11]

<="" a="">Renegade Materials (Springboro, OH)


Renegade Materials (Springboro, OH; $1.6M SBIR) is ready for a boom.  The 22-employee company already has selected equipment and blueprints to more than quadruple its 26,000-square-foot footprint in Springboro, should deals in the works come through [Joe Cogliano, Dayton Business Journal, Jun 1, 12]

 

<="" a="">Renewable Alternatives

Too Much Transfer. Mere months ago, the University of Missouri routinely touted chemical engineering professor Galen Suppes for his innovative research into renewable energy.  Now the school considers him a renegade scientist trying to keep the university from getting its fair share of profits from his inventions. Missouri is suing the professor in federal court.  ... In 2003, they formed a spin-off company, Renewable Alternatives  ($1M SBIR), to develop dozens of inventions related to fuel cell technology, nontoxic diesel fuel additives and an eco-friendly antifreeze.  [AP, Feb 9, 09]

<="" a="">Renovis (S San Francisco, CA)

Renovis (S San Francisco, CA; one Phase 2 SBIR) up 20% on news that German pharmaceutical company Evotec AG will buy it for $150 M in stock to expand its research into treatments for inflammatory diseases.  [AP, Sep 19,07]

 

<="" a="">Rentech (Los Angeles, CA)

A Punter with Pounds. A British Virgin Islands-based investor offered $372M for Rentech (Los Angeles, CA; no SBIR) an alternative energy company building a $50M fuels plant in metro Denver, ... attempting to commercialize a process to make diesel and aviation fuel from coal, natural gas, petroleum byproducts and biomass such as wood chips. [Denver Post, Dec 19, 07]

 

<="" a="">Replidyne

Replidyne up 16% [Jan 16, 08]

 

<="" a="">Repligen

Repligen  up 12%  [Sep 10, 12]

Repligen up 16%  [Aug 2, 12]

Repligen down 10%  [Jun 22, 12]  said federal regulators have requested additional clinical trial data for their proposed imaging agent that is designed to improve detection of pancreas problems.[Boston Globe]

Repligen down 40% [Apr 26, 12]  said it expects U.S. health regulators to reject its imaging agent to detect structural abnormalities in the pancreas [Reuters]

Repligen up 11% [Jan 25, 12]

Repligen  said it has completed the acquisition of the business of Novozymes Biopharma Sweden AB, the Swedish unit of Novozymes Biopharma. The all-cash transaction, which was announced in October, had Repligen making an upfront payment of $22.7 million.
[Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Dec 21, 11]

Repligen  said  that it has a definitive agreement to buy the biopharma business of Novozymes A/S (Sweden) in a cash transaction of 17 million euros ($22.7 million) and future potential milestone payments of 4 million euros ($5.6 million) ....   includes a 45,000-square-foot protein factory that will double Repligen’s manufacturing capacity and established product lines with long-term customers. The products include various forms of Protein A, which is fundamental to the production of monoclonal antibodies and growth factor products used in the large-scale fermentation of cells.  [Mass High Tech, Oct 28, 11]

Repligen said today that the[FDA]  has granted Fast Track status to its potential treatment for spinal muscular atrophy  [Boston Globe, Jun 23, 11]

Repligen down 28% [Mar 7, 11] after it said Monday that a midstage clinical trial showed that one of its drug candidates was no more effective than a placebo in treating bipolar depression.  [AP, Mar 7]

Repligen has taken in $1.4 million in Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) funding to aid research in a treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA). [Mass High Tech, Dec 15, 10]

Repligen has received three grants, totalling in excess of $6 million, to apply to its HDAC inhibitor research for neurodegenerative diseases like Friedreich’s Ataxia and Huntington’s Disease. [Mass High Tech, Aug 3, 10]

Repligen up 10% [May 27, 10]

Repligen  said that the FDA has granted orphan drug designation to RG2833, the company's investigational drug to treat Friedreich's ataxia. [Boston Globe, May 24, 10]

Repilgen  up 14% [Mar 31, 10]

Repligen said today that it extended its long-term deal to supply recombinant protein A to General Electric's GE Healthcare unit. [AP, Jan 28, 10]

Repligen won a $731,000 Muscular Dystrophy Association research grant to development treatment for Friedreich’s ataxia, a rare neurodegenerative disease. The grant is the second such funding from the MDA for the disease. [Mass High Tech, Dec 15, 09]

Replegen down 16% [Dec 9, 09] said that its pancreas imaging agent RG1068 did not meet its main goal in a late-stage clinical study. [Boston Globe, Dec 9]

Repligen  down 10% [Dec 1, 08]  On a stock bloodbath day

Repligen up 13% [Oct 16, 08]

Repligen down 16% [Oct 15, 08]

Repligen  up 18% [Oct 10, 08]

Biopharmaceutical Repligen got $1.125 million in research grants to develop tools to help create new treatments for the rare neurodegenerative disease Friedreich’s ataxia. The Muscular Dystrophy Association awarded Waltham-based Repligen (Nasdaq: RGEN) $1 million and the Friedreich’s Ataxia Research Foundation and the National Ataxia Foundation combined to give $125,000, according to Repligen officials. Repligen will use the funds to develop and prepare drug candidates for clinical trials and also develop biomarkers to monitor the effect of the drugs.  [Mass High Tech, Sep 4, 08]

Repligen up 14% after it reached a settlement in its lawsuit alleging patent infringement against large-cap Bristol-Myers Squibb's rheumatoid-arthritis treatment Orencia.  [Wall Street Journal, Apr 9, 08]

Repligen up 11% [Apr 4, 08]

Repligen said it has started a Phase 3 clinical trial to evaluate an imaging agent that would help MRI tests better detect abnormalities in the ducts of the pancreas. ... about 150,000 pancreatic MRI's are conducted in the United States each year. [Boston Globe, Mar 27, 08]

Repligen down 12% [Feb 25, 08]

Repligen down 12% [Jan 4, 08]

Repligen got a $65 M settlement from ImClone Systems on a patent infringement lawsuit . [Mass High Tech, Sep 11]

Repligen jumped 25% on a favorable patent-suit ruling. [Jul 31, 06]

Repligen took a huge dive (42%) when it announced that its experimental treatment for autism flunked late-stage clinical trial, second-quarter revenue of $1.4 million, sells several drugs which it did not develop itself.

<="" a=""> Research Frontiers (Woodbury, NJ)

Smart Glass  One company seems to have solved the problem of making smart windows that shut out sunlight on command. DOD has poured a lot of SBIR money into small companies who always seem to need another award. Research Frontiers Inc (Woodbury, NY) seems to have succeeded without any SBIR help.  A Wall Street Journal story (Sep 19) tells how. It went public in 1986 to raise the money (investors will speculate) for the suspended particle technology. Says CEO Robert Saxe, it wasn't an overnight technology . Which should partially explain why SBIR wasn't the route. SBIR was not intended for such long slogs (although no Congressman would object to a long slog by a company in his district and all Congress would like to avoid answering such questions). Oh, the technology seemed to work but on closer examination of the economics, it was unstable, the crystals clumped, and the windows bulged. One materialist estimates that it would cost $15/sqft more than drapes and curtains which translates to a ten-year recovery period. How many landlords accept ten-year payback periods? (Actually, the lower the prevailing interest rate, the longer the max acceptable payback period.) So, government agencies, keep believing in smart window technology, but don't blindly believe the company's story about commercialization.

 

<="" a="">Resolvyx Pharmaceuticals (Bedford, MA)

Resolvyx Pharmaceuticals (Bedford, MA; no SBIR) said it has initiated a clinical trial to evaluate a drug candidate for dry-eye syndrome, which affects an estimated 25 million to 35 million Americans. [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Dec 18]

Resolvyx Pharmaceuticals (Bedford, MA; no SBIR) hopes to use recent scientific research on how omega-3 fatty acids work to develop a powerful new class of drugs to treat inflammatory diseases, ranging from asthma to cardiovascular problems. ... is expected to say it has raised $25 M in a second round of venture capital ..in addition to an earlier round of $17M.  [Todd Wallack, Boston Globe, Apr 22]


<="" a="">Respicardia (Minnetonka, MN)

Med-tech startup Respicardia ( Minnetonka, MN; no SBIR) has lined up $6 million in debt financing that it will use to fund ongoing and future clinical trials. .... developing an implantable device that treats heart failure patients who also suffer from central sleep apnea, a condition that causes people to stop breathing for brief periods of time during the night.[Katharine Grayson, Minneapolis / St Paul Business Journal, Aug 10, 12]

<="" a="">Response Genetics (Los Angeles, CA)

Response Genetics (Los Angeles, CA; no SBIR, 40 employees) signed a nonexclusive license agreement with GlaxoSmithKline, which grants the pharmaceutical company some rights to Response Genetics's technology that assess gene mutations in tumor samples.  [Wall Street Journal, May 12]

<="" a="">Restoration Robotics

Dr. Frederic H. Moll, 56, is a soft-spoken man who can look uncomfortable on stage. Yet his role in founding Intuitive Surgical ($2.5M SBIR), the company that now dominates the field, and his current involvement with three other robotics companies, has kept him in the sights of investors, health care providers and fellow entrepreneurs.  ... He took the idea to his employer, Guidant, a medical device company. Guidant decided that robotic surgery was too futuristic and too risky, so Dr. Moll rounded up backers, resigned, and in 1995, founded Intuitive Surgical. [which] earned $144M last year on sales of $600M .... He’s now best known as chief executive of Hansen Medical  (no SBIR), a publicly traded robotics company focused on minimally invasive cardiac care. But he’s also an investor in and a board member of Mako Surgical (no SBIR), an orthopedics robotics company that recently went public, and he is a co-founder and chairman of Restoration Robotics (no SBIR), a start-up company focused on cosmetic surgery. [Barnaby Feder, New York Times, May 4]

 

<="" a=""> Restore Medical

Medtronic agreed to acquire Restore Medical (Roseville,MN; one SBIR) for $29 million, a deal that rescues the cash-starved company from possible insolvency from cash management problems. [Minneapolis Star Tribune, Apr 23, 08]

Restore Medical took a 12% sleeping aid [Mar 1, 07] as it reported a big loss and got a brokerage downgrade.

Rethink Robotics

Shake hands with Baxter, the first product of Rethink Robotics, an ambitious start-up company in a revived manufacturing district here [Boston, MA], is a significant bet that robots in the future will work directly with humans in the workplace. ....  The company is betting it can broaden the market for robots by selling an inexpensive machine that can collaborate with human workers, the way the computer industry took off in the 1980s when the prices of PCs fell sharply and people without programming experience could start using them right out of the box. [John Markoff, New York Times, Sep 18, 12]

Rethink Robotics  (no SBIR),  founded by Rodney Brooks, one of the few rock stars in the world of robotics, is due to unveil its first robots Tuesday,with promises to bring automation to a much broader array of manufacturers. Most robot users today are large companies, such as car and semiconductor makers, able to afford machines that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and require highly trained technicians. Dr. Brooks's Inc., which has raised $57 million in venture capital so far, has vowed to offer inexpensive machines that are easier to operate. .....  Dr. Brooks also promised to manufacture Rethink's robots in the U.S., which would allow it to quickly respond to customers and protect its intellectual property.  [James Hagerty, Wall Street Journal, Sep 14, 12]

Rethink Robotics, formerly Heartland Robotics, has received a $30 million Series C round of funding, the company announced ... focused on building robots that drive efficiency in manufacturing  [Patricia Resende, Mass High Tech, Jun 19, 12]

 

<="" a="">Retriever Technology (Santa Fe, NM)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has approved $250,000 in new funding for four companies from its Venture Acceleration Fund [which] provides investments of up to $100,000 to regional entrepreneurs, companies, investors or strategic partners who use LANL technology or expertise to create or grow regional businesses. Award recipients are chosen based on potential for regional impact, team composition, technical feasibility, market opportunity, and the availability of matching funds or in-kind contributions. Retriever Technology (Santa Fe, NM; no SBIR) will receive $25,000 to upgrade a low-light imaging camera for advanced digital imaging into a more user-friendly and functional form for customer demonstration and evaluation.  Elemetric Instruments (Los Alamos, NM; no SBIR) will get $100,000 to further develop a prototype of an instrument that immediately detects elements in liquids and gases with continuous online, real-time processing. The device, called an element presence detector, is based on LANL technology with potential markets among food and pharmaceutical makers.  STAR Cryoelectronics (Santa Fe, NM; $2M SBIR) will get $75,000 to accelerate development of a high-resolution alpha particle spectrometer to be used in nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation work.  Veezyon (somewhere, NM; no SBIR) will receive $50,000 to improve the technical capabilities of its Veezyon.com Web site — a knowledge-based online video site focusing on shared interest user collaboration.  Since the venture fund was launched in fall 2006, LANL has awarded about $600,000 to six companies, not including the new grants, [New Mexico Business Weekly, Jan 7, 09]

 

<="" a="">Reva Medical (San Diego, CA)

Reva Medical (San Diego, CA; one SBIR) says its stock is expected to begin trading tomorrow on the Australian Securities Exchange after the medical device company raised almost $85 million in its IPO  .... will use the proceeds to continue development of its absorbable ReZolve stent, including clinical trials.  [Bruce Bigelow, signonsandiego.com, Dec 22, 10]

Reva Medical  (San Diego, CA; one SBIR)  which is developing bioabsorbable stents for treating arterial disease, has filed for a $63 million IPO on the Australian Stock Exchange, according to PE Hub. Inteq Ltd., a boutique investment bank in Sydney, is serving as the lead underwriter. The company has raised about $57 million in venture capital funding  [Bruce Bigelow, signonsandiego.com, Sep 8, 10]

Reva Medical (San Diego, CA; one SBIR) plans to raise $63 million through an IPO to fund tests of its experimental coronary stent that is absorbed by the body over time.  [Keith Darcé, San Diego Union Tribune, Aug 19, 10]

<="" a="">Revegen (Farmington, CT)

Six start-up technology firms have received grants as part of the state's small-business incubator program,  ... administered by the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology ...  $32,000 to $50,000 went to: AllerQuest LLC of West Hartford, Catelectric Corp. of Storrs, Hydrogen Safety of East Hartford, Quadra-Aerrow International of Glastonbury, Revegen Inc. of Farmington and the Center for Network Centric Product Support Research of East Hartford.  [Hartford Courant, Dec 12, 08]  no SBIR for any

<="" a="">ReVision Therapeutics (San Diego, CA)

ReVision Therapeutics (San Diego, CA) biopharmaceutical startup, formed just five months ago to resume development of a compound for treating age-related macular degeneration, has reported encouraging results from a two-year, mid-stage clinical trial of the compound, known as fenretinide. ...  The deal to acquire the compound and start ReVision means fenretinide has come full circle. It was initially under development as a potential treatment for macular degeneration by Sytera (San Diego, CA; no SBIR) founded in 2004. But development of the drug moved to Sirion Therapeutics (Tampa, FL; no SBIR), an ophthalmic-focused biopharmaceutical that acquired fenretinide through its 2006 merger with Sytera. Sirion conducted the mid-stage clinical trials at a number of sites throughout Florida, and Lichter says the last patient left the trial in April.  [Bruce Bigelow, signonsandiego.com, Sep 18, 10]

<="" a="">ReVolt Tech

ARPA-E Awards. The administration announced $106M in ARPA-E stimulus awards. Small biz winners:  Ginkgo BioWorks (Boston, MA; one SBIR) $6M primary;  OPX Biotech (no SBIR) $6M primary; Logos Tech (Arlington, VA; $2M SBIR) secondary; Sion Power (Tucson, AZ; $250K SBIR) $5M primary; ReVolt Tech (no SBIR) $5M primary; PolyPlus Battery (Berkeley, CA; one SBIR) $5M; Pellion Tech (no SBIR) $3.2M primary; A123 Systems  secondary, twice;  Planar Energy Devices (no SBIR) $4M; Maxpower (Harleysville, PA; $9M SBIR) secondary; NanoLab (Newton, MA; $5M SBIR) secondary; Codexis (no SBIR) $4.6M; Nexant (no SBIR) secondary.

<="" a="">Rexahn Pharmaceuticals (Rockville, MD)

Rexahn Pharmaceuticals (Rockville, MD; no SBIR) sold common stock to institutional investors, generating gross proceeds of $5 million.... developing drugs for cancer, nervous system disorders and sexual dysfunction. [Washington Business Journal, Oct 26, 09] Shares trade under a buck.

<="" a=""> RF Code (Austin, TX)

RF Code (Austin, TX; no SBIR) got $13M VC part of which pays for moving from AZ to TX where it will make RFID devices to track people and stuff. [Austin American-Statesman, Jul 19] The Navy had an SBIR RFID poster child a decade ago in Savi Technology which Lockheed-Martin bought for $400M.

 

<="" a="">RFMicron (Austin, TX)

When startup FireFly LED Lighting (Austin, TX; no SBIR) was accepted into the Austin Technology Incubator two years ago, its LED bulbs were still prototypes.  Since then, the company has launched its product line, signed customers including Kerbey Lane Cafe and the University of Texas and received $3.4 million from backers including the Central Texas Angel Network and the Texas Emerging Technology Fund.....  Since its founding in 1989 by legendary business leader George Kozmetsky, ATI has worked with more than 200 startups, helping them raise nearly $1 billion in investment capital.  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American Statesman, Jan 26, 12]  Graduates: Agile Planet,  Atomometrics, Axelo, Calxeda, Dorsan Biofuels, Famigo, GameSalad, Ideal Power Converters, Itzbig, Nitero, Notice Technologies, Open Algae, Qcue, RFMicron, RRE Solar,  Savara Pharmaceuticals, Spredfast, Terapio ($500K  SBIR), Unwired Nation, WiMax.com. 

From the Texas Emerging Technology Fund, Image Trends (Austin, TX; no SBIR) which develops image correction and enhancement products for commercial and amateur photographers will receive $1 million, and RFMicron (Austin, TX; no SBIR) $250,000 to speed development of its microchip technology  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American-Statesman, Jul 14, 08]  Og ten central TX companies fed from the fund, only one has failed so far: Nanocoolers (no SBIR) Tried to create a thermoelectric cooling system that would help cool semiconductors. Closed in 2007. The others: Molecular Imprints Inc. Nanotechnology company that makes advanced equipment used in producing computer chips, disk  drives and other products. Monebo Technologies (no SBIR) Heart monitoring device called CardioBelt that enables users to obtain their own electrocardiogram while at home.  Quantum Logic Devices  ($1+M SBIR, moved from NC) Developing a system that uses single-electron devices to analyze  DNA, protein and other molecular interactions. Receptor Logic Ltd. (no SBIR) Developing antibodies to improve understanding of the immune system and lead to better drugs and vaccines. Xitronix(no SBIR) Developing advanced semiconductor testing technology. XTreme Power (no SBIR) Developing electrical storage systems that are used to cut energy bills for commercial and industrial plants.

<="" a=""> RF Surgical (Bellevue, WA)

RF Surgical  (Bellevue, WA; no SBIR) which has an R&D facility in San Diego, raised $12 million from venture investors. ... developing technology to make sure surgical sponges and intstruments aren’t left inside patients, plans to use the money to do more R&D on its technology and build up its sales and marketing.  [Bruce Bigelow, xconomy.com, Sep 15, 11]

<="" a=""> Rhenium Alloys (Elyria, OH)

Balls - An 11th Form of Rhenium. Rhenium Alloys (Elyria, OH) which sells ten forms of rhenium got a BMDO Phase 2 SBIR for an 11th form: micro-spheres. The immediate use for BMDO is coating small rocket nozzles that have to pass really hot gas. There may be a little puffery going on as the company invites present orders for the balls that BMDO says it is only nursing into existence as a prototype. It's the company's first Phase 2. Neither the abstract nor  Rhenium's website hint at the economic value of the spheres beyond cost-insensitive military rockets.

<="" a=""> Rhevision

Ben Choi, one of the In-Q-Tel guys, told us yesterday he's just made an investment into Rhevision Technology, which is making a miniature zoom lens for cameras. Its Website is still under construction, but the company says modestly that the lens module is "going to rock the entire camera-phone industry."  [Siliconbeat.com, May 5]

 

<="" a=""> Rho (Chapel Hill, NC)

Rho (Chapel Hill, NC; $2M SBIR) a drug research company, received a $38.9 million contract from  NIH ...  provide biostatistical, data management and safety services to the Immune Tolerance Network ... founded in 1984 by two UNC-Chapel Hill researchers. The company now employs about 350 [Raleigh News & Observer, Sep 5, 08]



<="" a=""> Rhythm (also Rhythm Pharmaceuticals (Boston, MA)

Rhythm (Boston, MA;  no SBIR) biotechnology company focused on diabetes and obesity, announced that it has raised $25 million in a Series B financing round. ...  brings the total capital raised to $65 million. ... said it will use the proceeds to continue advancing its small-peptide therapeutics for metabolic diseases through Phase 2 clinical trials. [Chris Reidy, Boston Globe, Jun 13, 12]

Rhythm Pharmaceuticals (Boston, MA; no SBIR), a virtual life sciences company making peptide-based drugs to treat conditions such as obesity and diabetes, has launched with a $21 million Series A round ... has licensed intellectual property from French pharmaceutical Ipsen SA  [Mass High Tech, Mar 15, 10]

<="" a=""> Rhythmia Medical (Burlington, MA)

Rhythmia Medical (Burlington, MA; at least $200K SBIR) has taken in $2.7 million in an equity round [says an SEC filing] ... had raised $12 million since its founding in 2004   [Mass High Tech, Mar 19, 10]

 

<="" a="">Rib-X Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT)

Rib-X Pharma going IPO tomorrow to raise about $70M with Deutsche Bank as lead. will be highly speculative and any reward will be years in the making. ...  has also received a letter from its independent financial auditing firm expressing doubts about whether Rib-X will be financially able to continue its business. Additionally, in its S1, Rib-X states that the cash from the IPO is still not enough to complete a phase 3 trial of Delafloxacin.  [seekingalpha.com, May 7]

Rib-X Pharmaceuticals  scored a $3 million milestone payment from French biotech giant Sanofi related to a license for the New Haven, Conn.-based company’s antibiotics to fight superbugs. .... To date, Rib-X has taken in $22 million through four milestone payments, and it could receive as much as $740 million from the [July 2011] deal.   [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Feb 7, 12]

Rib-X Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT; $1.1M SBIR) drug development firm co-founded by Yale Nobel laureate, intends to raise as much as $80 million in an[IPO] ... with 43 employees, is developing several antibiotics, notably Delafloxacin, which is in clinical trials and is intended for the treatment of "acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections," primarily in hospitals.  [Dan Haar, Hartford Courant, Nov 29, 11]

Rib-X Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT; $1.1M SBIR) has taken in $5.5 million of a planned $22 million offering combining debt, warrants and options  [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Jan 28, 11]

Rib-X Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT; $1.1M SBIR), an antibiotics company has taken in a $20 million financing ...  to help bring its delafloxacin antibiotic drug to a Phase 2b study this year  [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Jan 11, 11]

Rib-X Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT; $1M SBIR) antibiotics company raised $5.5 million of a planned $15 million offering of debt and warrants, according to [SEC] filing ... founded in 2001 by Yale University colleagues Peter Moore, William Jorgensen and Thomas Steitz, winner of a portion of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work describing the structure and function of the ribosome. ... On its website, Rib-X notes that it has raised more than $123 million in three [VC] rounds.  [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Jun 11, 10]

Rib-X Pharmaceuticals (New Haven, CT; $1M SBIR) co-founder and Yale University professor Thomas Steitz has won a share of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work describing the structure and function of the ribosome, according to the school. Steitz, a professor of molecular biophysics, biochemistry and chemistry, will share the $1 million prize [three ways]  [Mass High Tech, Oct 7, 09]


<="" a=""> Ridgetop Group (Tucson, AZ)

The rest of DOE,'s Phase II list also shows a preference for SBIR experience: Euclid Labs (Solon, OH; $18M SBIR since 2004, all DOE including one $10M award), four new Phase IIs;  Radiabeam Technologies (Santa Monica, CA, $10M SBIR since 2005  SBIR) three awards; Tech-x (Boulder, CO; something over $50M SBIR since 1994) three new awards Muons (Batavia, IL;  $13M since 2002 SBIR, all DOE) three awards; Far-Tech (San Diego, CA;$9+M SBIR since 2003) two awards; Ridgetop Group (Tucson, AZ; $10M SBIR since 2002) two awards;  Calabazas Creek Research (San Mateo, CA; $26M since 1994) two awards; Niowave (Lansing, MI;  $5M since 2007 SBIR) two awards;  Mesa Photonics  (Santa Fe, NM;  $0.8M since 2008 SBIR) two awards; Green Mountain Radio Research ( Colchester, VT;  $5.7M SBIR)  two awards.  Of 104 awards, 33 went to multiple winners who already had collected $378M SBIR from the federal government.  Is DOE over-emphasizing contractor competence at the expense of companies and technologies with brighter futures?  No one knows becasue Congress shows little interest in the question, and the agency has a bias toward making itself smarter.  

<="" a=""> RipCode (Austin TX)

RipCode (Austin TX; no SBIR) unveils today a powerful but compact box that takes up a small slot in a computer data center but does the video processing work of 10 to 20 servers. [Kirk Ladendorf, Austin American-Statesman, Sep 17]

 

<="" a="">Rive Technology (Cambridge, MA)

Rive Technology (Cambridge, MA;  no SBIR) announced the closing of a $25 million round of financing. ...  seeks to commercialize catalyst technology for petroleum refining. Rive's proprietary technology, invented at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, makes traditional zeolite refining catalysts more accessible to hydrocarbon molecules  [Boston Globe, Dec 14, 10]

In an effort to make gasoline production cleaner and more efficient, Rive Technology (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) is developing a catalyst that can help turn a greater percentage of crude petroleum into gasoline and other usable products. ... could increase the proportion of petroleum processed by as much as 7 to 9 percent. ...  Javier Martinez, a cofounder of Rive and now a professor at the University of Alicante, in Spain, came up with a way to control the size of the openings while working as a postdoctoral fellow at MIT's Nanostructured Materials Research Laboratory.   [Neil Savage, MIT Tech Review, Jul 10, 09]  has raised $22 million in venture capital   [company website]

 

<="" a=""> RJA Dispersions

Aldevon (Fargo, ND; no SBIR), maker of DNA and protein products is putting a research and sales operation in [Wisconsin] ....  founded by two ND State U graduates, has more than 70 employees, and provides products and services to pharmaceutical companies and diagnostic test-makers.  ... also welcomed to Wisconsin: RJA Dispersions (no SBIR), VitalMedix (no SBIR) and Rapid Diagnostek (no SBIR), from Minnesota; Flex Biomedical (one SBIR) and Exact Sciences (no SBIR), from Massachusetts; NanoMedex ($1M SBIR), from Florida; and Inviragen ($2M SBIR) from Colorado. Biotechnology is the fastest-growing segment of the Wisconsin economy, with an annualized growth rate of nearly 7%, [Gov] Doyle said in a statement. The sector has 400 companies in the state with 34,000 employees.

<="" a=""> R.L. Phillips (Carlsbad, CA)

Information security firm R.L. Phillips (Carlsbad, CA; no SBIR) is being bought by a Michigan firm for $2.2M.  Phillips, founded in 1998 by James Pietrocini and Rebecca Phillips, generated about $5.3 M in annual revenue. It has about 30 employees and serves customers that include the Navy, the Marine Corps and the NSA. [San Diego Union Tribune, Sep 6]

 

<="" a="">RMH Sciences (Philadelphia, PA)

BioAdvance, operator of the Biotechnology Greenhouse Corp. of Southeastern Pennsylvania, said it made commitments of $2.4 million to seven new life science companies:  RMH Sciences  (Philadelphia, PA; no SBIR) which is developing antibacterial agents for the treatment of resistant gram negative and gram positive infections; Ossianix  (no SBIR), which is developing single domain antibodies based on the shark VNAR structure to treat immunological, inflammatory, musculoskeletal, neurologic, and other disorders; Merganser Biotech (Newtown Square, PA; no SBIR) which is developing hepcidin peptides for the treatment of hemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell anemia and diseases of iron overload; Anakim Biologics (Exton, PA; no SBIR) which is developing efficiencies and improvements in biologics manufacturing; Enzium (Philadelphia, PA; no SBIR) which is developing highly sensitive biosensor methodologies for the testing of proteases and other enzymes; Imiplex (Newtown, PA; two SBIRs) which is developing the TriPol platform, engineered from proteins, designed to provide a flexible system for constructing diverse nanostructures; Cool-Bio (Wayne, PA; no SBIR) which is developing platelet-inhibiting technology geared specifically to activation during the cooling process of cardiac bypass.  [John George, Philadelphia Business Journal, Jun 20, 12]

<="" a="">Robopsy (Cambridge,MA)

After several years of development, startup Robopsy (Cambridge, MA; no SBIR) is entering the home stretch in its quest to get to market with its disposable robotic diagnosis devices. ...  technology was jointly developed by experts at Massachusetts General Hospital and MIT. Since Robopsy first launched several years ago, the system has gone through two prototypes, explained co-founder Rajiv Gupta, MGH laboratory director for the department of radiology  [Marc Songini, Mass High Tech, May 1, 09]

<="" a=""> Robotic FX

Robotic FX will be dissolved and certain of its residual assets will be retained by iRobot, according to the company. [Founder and ex-iRobot employee] Ahed has been prohibited from participating in competitive activities in the robotics industry for five years.  [Mass High Tech, Dec 24]

A federal judge in Boston has issued an injunction against a Chicago-area robot maker accused of stealing trade secrets from iRobot [Boston Globe, Nov 3, 07]   Defendant Robotic FX was not reported as railing against "activist un-elected judges."

<="" a="">Robotic Technology (Potomac, MD)

The Energetically Autonomous Tactical Robot is known, of course, by its acronym: EATR. It is the brainchild of Robotic Technology  (Potomac, MD; $900K SBIR) ....  could, for instance, forage for biofuel while an [Army] unit on a long-endurance mission rested. It could then be used to recharge their electrical devices, carry some of their equipment or even transport the soldiers. ...  Robert Finkelstein, Robotic Technology’s president, estimates that about 68 kilograms (150 pounds) of vegetation would provide enough electricity for the machine to travel around 160km (100 miles).  [The Economist, Jun 12, 10]

<="" a="">Rocky Research (Boulder City, NV)

Rocky's Cooler. A refrigerator with no compressor would come from the sorption system of Rocky Research (Boulder City, NV), says Design News, (Nov 4, 96). BMDO SBIR's support was matched in part by investment from Igloo Products during which the technology was the basis for a new FMC Corp factory in Arkansas. Look for ever more portable coolers with the Igloo label if and when Rocky can raise the ever rising capital needed by a maturing technology. BMDO's invitation of matching the early capital brought in Igloo's first investment but government's role ends there (unless you believe in programs like ATP which let companies avoid the discipline of the marketplace and appeal, instead, to the technology preferences of government experts).

RRE Solar (TX)


When startup FireFly LED Lighting (Austin, TX; no SBIR) was accepted into the Austin Technology Incubator two years ago, its LED bulbs were still prototypes.  Since then, the company has launched its product line, signed customers including Kerbey Lane Cafe and the University of Texas and received $3.4 million from backers including the Central Texas Angel Network and the Texas Emerging Technology Fund.....  Since its founding in 1989 by legendary business leader George Kozmetsky, ATI has worked with more than 200 startups, helping them raise nearly $1 billion in investment capital.  [Lori Hawkins, Austin American Statesman, Jan 26, 12]  Graduates: Agile Planet,  Atomometrics, Axelo, Calxeda, Dorsan Biofuels, Famigo, GameSalad, Ideal Power Converters, Itzbig, Nitero, Notice Technologies, Open Algae, Qcue, RFMicron, RRE Solar,  Savara Pharmaceuticals, Spredfast, Terapio ($500K  SBIR), Unwired Nation, WiMax.com. 


<="" a="">Rubicon Tech (Bensonville, IL)

Rubicon Tech (Bensonville, IL; one SBIR) down 13%%  [Aug 3, 12]

 

<="" a="">Rules-Based Medicine (Austin TX)

Rules-Based Medicine (Austin, TX; $2M SBIR)  filed to raise $90 million in a public stock offering in 2010 ...  founded in 2002, has developed technology for tests that identify biomarkers that can signal whether a patient has a particular disease or disorder and how well drugs are working. [Austin American Statesman, Dec 24, 09]

Rules-Based Medicine (Austin TX; one SBIR) got a $1.1M Phase I/Phase II "Fast-Track" SBIR from the National Cancer Institute for the development of 50 new quantitative, multiplexed immunoassays for cancer-related proteins . It calls itself the world’s leading multiplexed biomarker testing company [company press release]

 

<="" a="">Rushford Hypersonic

NanoReturn. Will any of this stuff translate into an economic windfall for Minnesota? So far, the U has licensed nanotechnology to three companies, two of them local, with mixed results.  Nanocopoeia (St. Paul , MN; $1M SBIR) is trying to divest its original medical device coating business to focus on pharmaceuticals. Rushford Hypersonic (no SBIR) next month will open the world's first hypersonic plasma particle disposition plant in southeastern Minnesota. Innovalight, (Austin, TX to St. Paul, MN to Sunnyvale, CA; $900K SBIR in TX), which originally focused on light bulbs, is now making solar cells. ...  The U's uneven experience with nanoscience mirrors corporate America's teasing and often frustrating flirtation with a technology that's failed, so far, to match hype with reality. Despite millions of dollars in government research money and venture capital, making big bucks off nanotechnology remains an elusive dream. [Thomas Lee, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Jun 28, 09]  Nanostuff, GaAs, CVD diamond, SiC substrates, and such, are the kind of futures that SBIR should invest in until economic barriers show that it has only a long term possible future. Then it should be turned over to long term investors with long green, not slogged away in a small high tech nursery program. SBIR's goal should be economic visibility for a technology, not long term development a few bucks at a time in life-style companies.

 

<="" a="">RXi Pharmaceuticals (Worcester, MA)

RXi Pharmaceuticals will split into two publicly traded companies. The first, called Galena Biopharma, will focus on developing targeted cancer therapies and will be headquartered in Portland, Ore. RXi will be spun off later this year and will continue to work on RNAi-based therapeutics --- the company’s original mission. [Arlene Weintraub, Boston Globe, Sep 26, 11]

RXi Pharmaceuticals (Worcester, MA; $600K SBIR) made a public stock and warrants offering that could bring about $12 million ... announced at the end of March that it planned to spend about $7.2 million in a stock deal to acquire Apthera Inc., an Arizona biotechnology company developing cancer therapeutics. At the beginning of March, RXI raised $8.1 million through a public stock offering [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Apr 15, 11]

RXi Pharmaceuticals (Worcester, MA; no SBIR) is raising $8.1 million through a public stock offering ...  In September 2010, RXi teamed up with EyeGate Pharmaceuticals (Waltham, MA;  no SBIR) to collaborate on an effort to deliver RNAi therapeutics to the eye to treat retinal disorders. [Mass High Tech, Mar 1, 11]

RXi Pharmaceuticals (Worcester, MA; no SBIR) won an Advanced Technology $600K [NIH]grant [for] pre-clinical development of RNAi therapeutics.   ... founded in 2006 by University of Massachusetts researcher [Nobel laureate] Craig Mello  [Michelle Lang, Mass High Tech, Jul 13, 10]

 

<="" a="">RxMedic (Raleigh, NC)

RxMedic  (Raleigh, NC; no SBIR) a 3-year-old maker of robotic helpers for pharmacies is under a new owner that could boost sales for the local company’s automated pill sorting system. RxMedic was acquired last month by the JMSmith Corp., a health care company in Spartanburg, S.C., that specializes in pharmacy support services. [John Murawski, Raleigh News & Observer, Jun 11, 10]

<="" a="">Rypos (Holliston, MA)

Rypos (Holliston, MA; no SBIR) makers of filter technology for reducing diesel vehicle emissions, has taken in $3.15 million of a planned $3.5 million Series B funding round, according to federal documents. ...  founded in 1997 and spent almost eight years developing its technology, not recording any revenue from sales until 2007. The company’s filters range in price from $4,000 for a truck filter to more than $100,000 for a filter attached to a large generator. Rypos primarily targets transport refrigeration units and diesel generators, and the bulk of the company’s sales come from California, officials have said. [Rodney Brown, Mass High Tech, Mar 22, 11]